Sturm's Reflections on the works of God (from the Germ.).

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Page 249 - It shall even be as when an hungry man dreameth, and, behold, he eateth; but he awaketh, and his soul is empty: or as when a thirsty man dreameth, and, behold, he drinketh; but he awaketh, and, behold, he is faint, and his soul hath appetite: so shall the multitude of all the nations be, that fight against mount Zion.
Page 227 - Thou hidest thy face, they are troubled: thou takest away their breath, they die, and return to their dust. Thou sendest forth thy spirit, they are created: and thou renewest the face of the earth.
Page 227 - O Lord, how manifold are, thy works ! In wisdom hast thou made them all : The earth is full of thy riches. So is this great and wide sea, Wherein are things creeping innumerable, Both small and great beasts.
Page 215 - We no longer see the trees rich in blossom, nor the spring gay with verdure : the magnificence of summer, displayed in a thousand variations of colours, whose richness is relieved by the beautiful green of the meadows and waving groves, is no more ; the purple hue of the vine has faded, and the gilded ears no longer ornament the fields. The last leaves of the trees are falling; the pines, the elms, and the oaks, bend beneath the blasts of the fierce north wind ; and the fields which have lavished...
Page 21 - For all flesh is as grass, and all the glory of man as the flower of the grass. The grass withereth, and the flower thereof falleth away: but the word of the Lord endureth forever.
Page 15 - Hence proceed the different colours of the rainbow : they are seven in number, and appear in the following order; red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet. These colours appear the more vivid as the cloud-s which are behind are darker, and the drops of rain fall closer. The drops...
Page 202 - These vessels gradually enlarge in size till they form very large tubes, which return the blood back to the right ventricle of the heart. The blood is then propelled into the pulmonary artery, which disperses it through the lungs by innumerable small branches. It is there exposed to the action of the air, is afterward received by the pulmonary veins, and by them is conveyed to the left auricle of the heart.
Page 184 - When, therefore, at the time that the branches still daily grow, the stalks of the leaves do not increase, their fibres must necessarily be detached from the . fibres of the branches, and consequently the leaves will then fall. But we must not, suppose that these fallen leaves are entirely lost, and no longer useful : both reason and experience inform us to the contrary. Nothing perishes, nothing is useless in the world, consequently the leaves which fall from trees and plants...

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