Subjects of Desire: Hegelian Reflections in Twentieth-century France

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Columbia University Press, 1999 - Philosophy - 268 pages

This now classic work by one of the most important philosophers and critics of our time charts the trajectory of desire and its genesis from Hegel's formulation in Phenomenology of Spirit through its appropriation by Kojčve, Hyppolite, Sartre, Lacan, Deleuze, and Foucault, presenting how French reception of Hegel posed successive challenges to his metaphysics and view of the subject and revealed ambiguities within his position.

 

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Contents

Desire Rhetoric and Recognition in Hegels Phenomenology of Spirit
17
The Ontology of Desire
24
Lordship and Bondage
43
Historical Desires The French Reception of Hegel
61
Desire and Historical Agency
63
Desire Transience and the Absolute
79
From Hegel to Sartre
92
Sartre The Imaginary Pursuit of Being
101
The Life and Death Struggles of Desire Hegel and Contemporary French Theory
175
PostHegelian Themes in Derrida and Foucault
177
The Opacity of Desire
186
From Slave Morality to Productive Desire
205
Dialectics Unmoored
217
Final Reflections on the Overcoming of Hegel
230
Notes
239
Bibliography
253

Existential Desire in Being and Nothingness
121
The Circle of Sexual Desire in Being and Nothingness
138
Desire and Recognition in Saint Genet and The Family Idiot
156

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About the author (1999)

Judith Butler, Maxine Elliot Professor of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Berkeley, is the author of many works, including Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity; The Psychic Life of Power: Theories in Subjection; and Excitable Speech: A Politics of the Performative.

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