Subversive Genealogy: The Politics and Art of Herman Melville

Front Cover
University of California Press, Apr 18, 1985 - Literary Criticism - 354 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
This book makes several claims which ought to be stated at the outset: that Herman Melville is a recorder and interpreter of American society whose work is comparable to that of the great nineteenth-century European realists; that there was crisis of bourgeois society at midcentury on both continents, but that in America it entered politics by way of slavery and race rather than class; that the crisis called into question the ideal realm of liberal political freedom, and also that Melville was particularly sensitive to the American crisis because of the political importance of his clan and the political history of his family
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

PARTI
13
Gansevoort Melville Cannibals
42
Guert Gansevoort Masters and Slaves
77
MobyDick and the American 1848
102
PART II
153
Class Struggles in America
187
and Confidence Men
221
PART III
257
The Somers Mutiny and Billy Budd
288
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information