Successful Grant Writing: Strategies for Health and Human Service Professionals, Third Edition

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Springer Publishing Company, May 5, 2008 - Social Science - 424 pages

This is the updated and revised third edition of the standard guide to grant writing for health and human service professionals in academic and practice settings. Since the publication of the 2nd edition in 2003, the grant world has witnessed dramatic changes, from constraints in budgets to significant transformations in the submission process. This new edition is still geared both to inexperienced grant writers and those who have had some success but would like to expand their knowledge of grantsmanship.

The book lays out an approach to thinking about grant writing and the necessary vocabulary and knowledge to effectively read a funding opportunity, determine its appropriateness to pursue vis a vis your ideas, and level of professional development, and the processes for applying for funding. This edition also includes expanded coverage of important areas including how to develop a grant budget, implement effective trans-disciplinary collaborations (an approach that is being advocated in many of the new NIH funding opportunities), interpret reviewers' comments, and manage a grant project upon its award.

As in previous editions, each chapter is peppered with examples and helpful tables that summarize key points; outline specific questions to ask colleagues, program officers and administrators to obtain the critical information you need for success; and appendices full of specific examples and templates.

 

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Contents

The Perspective of Funding Agencies
1
Getting Started
3
77 A GRANT STORY
5
12 THE LANGUAGE OF GRANTSMANSHIP
6
73 DEVELOPING A PROFESSIONAL GROWTH PLAN USING A RESEARCH CAREER TRAJECTORY
11
Becoming Familiar With Funding Sources
25
21 SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PROFESSIONS
26
22 LEARNING ABOUT AND KEEPING TRACK OF FUNDING SOURCES
30
93 COOPERATIVE MODEL
167
94 COLLABORATIVE MODEL
170
95 CHOOSING AN APPROPRIATE PROJECT STRUCTURE
174
Understanding the Process of Collaboration
177
701 TECHNICAL FRAMEWORK FOR UNDERSTANDING COLLABORATION
178
102 ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF TEAM MEMBERS
181
703 FIVESTAGE MODEL OF COLLABORATION
186
104 INDICATORS OF COLLABORATION
193

23 INTERPRETING CALLS FOR PROPOSALS
41
The Perspective of the Grantee
51
Developing Your Ideas for Funding
53
32 WHICH IDEAS ARE HOT AND WHICH ARE NOT
60
33 MATCHING IDEAS TO FUNDING PRIORITIES
61
Learning About Your Institution
67
47 QUESTIONS TO ASK OF YOUR INSTITUTION
68
42 INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD PROCEDURES
72
Writing the Proposal
83
Common Sections of Proposals
85
Preparing A Budget
117
62 BASIC COMPONENTS OF A BUDGET
122
63 BUDGET JUSTIFICATION
130
64 NIH MODULAR BUDGET FORMAT
132
Technical Considerations
135
72 NEEDS ASSESSMENTS AND PILOT EFFORTS
138
73 OBTAINING CONTRACTUAL ARRANGEMENTS AND LETTERS OF SUPPORT
141
74 ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS
144
Strategies for Effective Writing
149
81 ORGANIZING FOR THE WRITING TASK
150
82 PROBLEMS WITH WRITING
153
83 THE GRANT WRITING TEAM
156
Models for Proposal Development
161
Four Project Structures
163
91 INDIVIDUAL MODEL
164
92 CONSULTATIVE MODEL
166
705 COMMON PROBLEMS IN COLLABORATIVE TEAMS AND EFFECTIVE SOLUTIONS
197
Life After a Proposal Submission
207
Understanding the Review Process
209
7 77 STRUCTURE OF THE REVIEW PROCESS
210
112 REVIEW CRITERIA
217
7 73 SCORES AND CATEGORIES OF ACCEPTANCE AND REJECTION
219
714 RESUBMISSION OPTIONS
223
A Case Study
235
121 EXCERPT FROM A PROPOSAL
239
122 A CRITIQUE
243
Receiving the Grant Award
249
Managing the Grant Award
251
131 FEDERAL AGENCY REGULATIONS
252
132 NOTIFICATION AND IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS
254
133 COMMON AGENCY REPORTS
255
134 INSTITUTIONAL RULES
259
135 BUDGET MANAGEMENT
261
136 ACADEMIC POLICIES
263
Common Questions and their Answers
271
Selected Key Acronyms
277
Select Web Sites
281
Sample Time Line Budget Sheets and Flow Charts
283
Guidelines for Evaluating Collaborative Teams
289
Index
297
Copyright

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Page 19 - Professionals (BHPr) within the Health Resources and Services Administration of the Department of Health and Human Services (also described later).

About the author (2008)

Kevin J. Lyons, PhD, is Director, Office of Institutional Research and Assistant Vice President, Program Evaluation and Student Faculty Surveys at Thomas Jefferson University. He has over 35 years of experience in higher education as a faculty member and administrator. Dr. Lyons has presented numerous papers at national and international scientific meetings and has been a frequent consultant to universities and government agencies on issues such as research development and program improvement. He has served on the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences' Committee on Health Services Research: Training and Workforce Issues and is recently participated in their Workshop on the Allied Health Workforce and Services. For ten years Dr. Lyons served as Editor of the Journal of Allied Health, the scholarly journal of the Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions, and has received the J. Warren Perry Distinguished Author Award and been elected a Fellow in that organization. He has co-edited a special issue of the Journal that was published in September, 2010 on interprofessional education which featured papers from national and international leaders in the field. Dr. Lyons is a funded investigator, having received grants and contracts from the Bureau of Health Professions to advance the research mission of the allied health professions, Dr. Lyons has served on peer review panels for FIPSE, OSERS, NCCAM and NIDRR in the U.S. Department of Education, the Bureau of Health Professions and for numerous professional journals. Dr Lyons is one of the founding members of American Interprofessional Health Collaborative. He also sits on the Board of Trustees for Rocky Mountain University of the Health Professions.

Laura N. Gitlin, PhD, is Professor, Department of Community Public Health Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, with joint appointments in the Department of Psychiatry and Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology, School of Medicine. She was founding Director of the Center for Applied Research on Aging and Health (CARAH) at Jefferson College of Health Professions, Thomas Jefferson University and now she is the founding director of the Center for Innovative Care in Aging at Johns Hopkins UniversityDr. Gitlin is a nationally and internationally recognized and well-funded researcher, having received research and training grants from both federal agencies and private foundations, including the Alzheimer's Association and the National Institutes of Health. She currently has over $15 million of committed research grant monies and has helped garner over $50 million in grant funding over the past 25 years. Dr. Gitlin has also served as a grant reviewer for the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, the Alzheimer's Association, the National Institute on Aging, the National Institute on Nursing Research, the Agency for Health Research and Quality, and the American Occupational Therapy Foundation. She has received numerous awards for her intervention studies including for her partnerships with community groups.

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