Suggestions for a System of Parks and Parkways for the City of Minneapolis

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Johnson, Smith, and Harrison, 1883 - Parks - 15 pages
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Page 1 - ... a sum sufficient, if used as a sinking fund, to pay the entire principal and interest of the cost of the park, in less time than the park was in the course of construction. ASSETS AND RESOURCES. The maximum of the liabilities of the city and county, on account of indebtedness, having been thus estimated, we come next to the no less important consideration of the assets and resources available for the payment of such indebtedness...
Page 4 - Do not be appalled at the thought of appropriating lands, which seem now too costly, simply because they are far out of proportion to your present wants. Look forward for a century, to the time when the city has a population of a million, and think what will be their wants. They will have wealth enough to purchase all that money can buy, but all their wealth cannot purchase a lost opportunity, or restore natural features of grandeur and beauty, which would then possess priceless value, and which...
Page 3 - If you have faith in the future greatness of your city, do not shrink from securing, while you may, such areas as will be adequate to the wants of such a city. Do not be appalled at the thought of appropriating lands, which seem now too costly, simply because they are far out of proportion to your present wants. Look forward for a century and think what will be their wants.
Page 4 - Look forward for a century and think what will be their wants. They will have wealth enough to purchase all that money can buy, but all their wealth cannot purchase a lost opportunity or restore natural features of grandeur and beauty, which would then possess priceless value and which you can preserve for them, if you will but say the word and save them from the destruction which certainly awaits them if you fail to utter it.
Page 11 - It is surely useless for me to enlarge upon the value in a sanitary light of sucha means of thorough ventilation as would be afforded by this magnificent channel through which the winds would come to the heart of the city purified by their passage over a long sheet of living water and through the foliage of miles of forest.
Page 4 - ... let me ask you to bear in mind the fact that the Mississippi river is not only the grand natural feature which gives character to your city and constitutes the main spring of its prosperity, but it is the object of vital interest and the center of attraction to intelligent visitors from every quarter of the' globe, who associate such ideas of grandeur with its name as no human creation can excite.
Page 4 - A fourth factor underscoring the importance of rational urban planning with ample open spaces was the catastrophic fire of 1871, which leveled most of central and northern Chicago. Olmsted, who inspected the effects of the fire, concurred with the views of Horace WS Cleveland, who wrote : Our experience in Chicago has taught us that it is hopeless to try to contend with fire when it sweeps on from block to block in great billows of flame, before which all human defences must go down in utter helplessness....
Page 2 - The popular idea, however, that the purchase of lands for parks and parkways involves the necessity of immediate large outlay for their improvement is not only erroneous, in fact, but in many cases would be inconsistent with a wise economy. It should be borne in mind that a policy which might be wise in an old city like New York is no example for a young and growing town like Minneapolis. We shall indeed be wise to take warning by her example, by securing the areas that are needed...
Page 1 - In the ten years succeeding the commencement of work on Central Park in New York, the increased valuation of taxable property in the wards immediately surrounding it was no less than $54,000,000, affording a surplus, after paying the interest on all the city bonds issued for the purchase and construction of the park, of...
Page 10 - And again, referring to sanitary conditions " always paramount to such as are purely f1nancial," quoting from the report of 1874, he says, " Nothing is so costly as sickness and disease, nothing so cheap as health. Whatever promotes the former is the worst sort of extravagance — whatever fosters the latter the truest economy.

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