Sultanistic Regimes

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Houchang E. Chehabi, Juan J. Linz
JHU Press, Jun 5, 1998 - Philosophy - 284 pages

Sultanistic regimes, as Juan Linz describes them, are authoritarian regimes based on personal ideology and personal favor to maintain the autocrat in power; there is little ideological basis for the rule except personal power. This volume of essays studies important sultantistic regimes in the Domanican Republic, Cuba, Haiti, Iran, and the Philippines. Part one contains two comparative essays, which discuss common characteristics of sultanistic regimes, compare them to totalitarian and authoritarian regimes, and trace common patterns for these regimes' rise and fall. Chehabi and Linz argue that sultanistic regimes do not offer favorable transitions to democracy, no matter what the person in power says. Part two applies Linz's model to country studies.

 

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Contents

ATypeofNondemocraticRule
3
Genesis and Demise of Sultanistic
26
Combining Structural and
49
The Trujillo Regime in the Dominican Republic
85
The Batista Regime in Cuba
113
The Somoza Regime in Nicaragua
132
The Duvalier Regime in Haiti
153
The Pahlavi Regime in Iran
182
The Marcos Regime in the Philippines
206
Notes
231
Index
277
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About the author (1998)

Houchang Chehabi is professor of international relations at Boston University. Juan J. Linz is Sterling Professor of Political Social and Science at Yale University.

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