Summa Theologica, Volume 1

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., Jan 1, 2013 - Religion - 592 pages
4 Reviews
"The Summa Theologica is the best-known work of Italian philosopher, scholar, and Dominican friar SAINT THOMAS AQUINAS (1225 1274), widely considered the Catholic Church s greatest theologian. Famously consulted (immediately after the Bible) on religious questions at the Council of Trent, Aquinas s masterpiece has been considered a summary of official Church philosophy ever since. Aquinas considers approximately 10,000 questions on Church doctrine covering the roles and nature of God, man, and Jesus, then lays out objections to Church teachings and systematically confronts each, using Biblical verses, theologians, and philosophers to bolster his arguments. In Volume I, Aquinas addresses: the existence and perfection of God the justice and mercy of God predestination the cause of evil the union of body and soul free will and fate and much more. This massive work of scholarship, spanning five volumes, addresses just about every possible query or argument that any believer or atheist could have, and remains essential, more than seven hundred years after it was written, for clergy, religious historians, and serious students of Catholic thought."
 

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Sparked a conversion

User Review  - AnnE - Christianbook.com

The Summa planted the seed for my husband's conversion from Atheism to Catholicism after he happened upon it in his highschool library. We named our first son Thomas! Easily 5 stars for me! Read full review

An everlasting wealth!

User Review  - Overstock.com

What can be said of St. Thomas Aquinas Summa At the end of his life after a mystical vision he said it was all straw.Compared to a mystical vision yes it is all straw. But anything short of that and ... Read full review

Contents

FIRST PART QQ 1119
1
The Existence of
13
On the Simplicity of
17
The Perfection of
20
Of Goodness in General
23
The Goodness of
28
The Infinity of
31
The Existence of God in Things
35
The Cause of Evil
253
TREATISE ON THE ANGELS 50 Of the Substance of the Angels Absolutely Considered
259
Of the Angels in Comparison with Bodies
264
Of the Angels in Relation to Place
267
Of the Local Movement of the An gels
272
Of the Knowledge of the Angels
273
Of the Medium of the Angelic Knowledge
277
Of the Angels Knowledge of Imma terial Things
280

The Immutability of
39
The Eternity of
43
The Unity of
47
How God Is Known by
51
The Names of
61
Of Gods Knowledge
72
Of Ideas
87
Of Truth
90
Concerning Falsity
97
The Life of
101
The Will of
103
Gods Love
115
The Justice and Mercy of
119
The Providence of
121
Of Predestination
126
The Book of Life
134
The Power of
136
Of the Divine Beatitude
142
The Procession of the Divine sons
147
The Divine Relations
152
The Divine Persons
155
The Plurality of Persons in
161
Of What Belongs to the Unity or Plurality in
164
The Knowledge of the Divine Per sons
168
Of the Person of the Father
175
Of the Person of the
179
Of the Image
181
Of the Person of the Holy Ghost
182
Of the Name of the Holy Ghost Love
188
Of the Name of the Holy Ghost as Gift
191
Of the Persons in Relation to the Essence
193
Of the Persons as Compared to the Relations or Properties
203
Of the Persons in Reference to the Notional Acts
207
Of Equality and Likeness among the Divine Persons
214
The Mission of the Divine Persons
219
45
222
13
227
TREATISE ON THE CREATION ion Poa 44 The Procession of Creatures from God and of the First Cause of All Things
229
The Mode of Emanation of Things from the First Principle
232
Of the Beginning of the Duration of Creatures
240
Of the Distinction of Things in General
245
The Distinction of Things in Par ticular
248
Of the Angels Knowledge of Mate rial Things
283
Of the Mode of the Angelic Knowl edge
288
The Will of the Angels
293
Of the Love or Dilection of the Angels
297
Of the Production of the Angels in the Order of Natural Being
301
Of the Perfection of the Angels in the Order of Grace and of Glory
304
The Malice of the Angels with Re gard to Sin
311
The Punishment of the Demons
319
TREATISE ON THE WORK OF THE SIX DAYS 65 The Work of Creation of Corporeal Creatures
324
On the Order of Creation Towards Distinction
328
On the Work of Distinction in Itself
334
On the Work of the Second Day
338
On the Work of the Third Day
342
On the Work of Adornment As Re gards the Fourth Day
345
On the Work of the Fifth Day
350
On the Work of the Sixth Day
351
TREATISE ON
363
Of the Union of Body and Soul
370
Of Those Things Which Belong
382
Of the Specific Powers of the Soul
390
Of the Intellectual Powers
396
Of the Appetitive Powers in Gen
408
Of FreeWill
419
What Our Intellect Knows in Mate
440
How the Human Soul Knows What
447
Of the First Production of Mans
458
The Production of the Woman
466
Of the State and Condition of
478
Of the Mastership Belonging
486
Of the Condition of the Offspring
496
TREATISE ON THE DIVINE
505
The Special Effects of the Divine
511
How One Creature Moves Another
521
Of the Angelic Degrees of Hier
528
The Ordering of the Bad Angels
537
The Action of the Angels on Man
543
Of the Guardianship of the Good
550
Of the Action of the Corporeal
559
On Fate
566
Of the Production of Man from
572
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Page 13 - For motion is nothing else than the reduction of something from potentiality to actuality. But nothing can be reduced from potentiality to actuality, except by something in a state of actuality. Thus that which is actually hot, as fire, makes wood, which is potentially hot, to be actually hot, and thereby moves and changes it. Now it is not possible that the same thing should be at once in actuality and potentiality in the same respect, but only in different respects. For what is actually hot cannot...

About the author (2013)

Thomas Aquinas, the most noted philosopher of the Middle Ages, was born near Naples, Italy, to the Count of Aquino and Theodora of Naples. As a young man he determined, in spite of family opposition to enter the new Order of Saint Dominic. He did so in 1244. Thomas Aquinas was a fairly radical Aristotelian. He rejected any form of special illumination from God in ordinary intellectual knowledge. He stated that the soul is the form of the body, the body having no form independent of that provided by the soul itself. He held that the intellect was sufficient to abstract the form of a natural object from its sensory representations and thus the intellect was sufficient in itself for natural knowledge without God's special illumination. He rejected the Averroist notion that natural reason might lead individuals correctly to conclusions that would turn out false when one takes revealed doctrine into account. Aquinas wrote more than sixty important works. The Summa Theologica is considered his greatest work. It is the doctrinal foundation for all teachings of the Roman Catholic Church.

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