Superheroes: Fashion and Fantasy

Front Cover
Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2008 - Comic books, strips, etc - 160 pages
This richly illustrated book explores how radical couture, avant-garde sportswear, and state-of-the-art military garments as seen through the lens of the superhero can be metaphors for sex, power, and politics. Beginning with the origins of the superhero costume, this volume looks at how designers have been influenced by iconographic components such as the cape, mask, boots, and unitard.

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Superheroes: fashion and fantasy

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Superheroes rely on fashion to back them up-morphing from street clothes to extraordinary, body-clinging gear, wearing capes that allow them to fly, sporting masks that conceal their true identity ... Read full review

Contents

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Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Michael Chabon was born in Washington, D.C. on May 24, 1963. He received a B.A. in English literature from the University of Pittsburgh in 1985 and a Master of Fine Arts degree in English writing at the University of California at Irvine in 1987. Chabon found success at the age of 24, when William Morrow publishing house offered him $155,000, a near-record sum, for the rights to his first novel The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, which was his thesis in graduate school. After The Mysteries of Pittsburgh became a national bestseller, he began writing a series of short stories about a little boy dealing with his parents' divorce. The stories, which in part appeared in The New Yorker and G.Q., were bound together in 1991 into a volume titled A Model World and Other Stories. His other works include Wonder Boys, The Astonishing Secret of Awesome Man, Telegraph Avenue, and Pop: Fatherhood in Pieces. In 2001 he won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction for his novel The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay. He and Ayelet Waldman are co-editors of, Kingdom of Olives and Ash: Writers Confront the Occupation..

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