Supporting a Family: Providing the Basics : Hearing Before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families, House of Representatives, Ninety-eighth Congress, First Session, Hearing Held in Washington, D.C., on July 18, 1983

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Page 51 - ... elderly people. I will conclude with some comments on steps that the Congress could take to alleviate the financial burden of high health costs on the elderly. Trends in Health Expenditures Health expenditures have been increasing at a particularly rapid rate in the last three years. In 1979, the US spent $215 billion on health services, supplies, research, and construction, or 8.9 percent of the Gross National Product. In 1982, the US spent $322 billion, or 10.5 percent of the GNP. In just three...
Page 5 - ... provided directly (through the earnings of another family member) or indirectly (through taxes and transfers). Two trends have been in evidence in most industrialized countries: (1) a shift in the composition of the "dependent population" from adult women to younger and older males and (2) a shift in the support of this population from private (family) to public sources. In the United States at the beginning of this century, about 31 percent of the entire population was in the labor force. By...
Page 80 - In homeownership opportunity is the threat of a much greater change In lifestyle than the social or political systems would accept. These changes Include the deregulation of savings Institutions and savings rates, prompted by the popularity and rapid growth of unregulated financial entities. Specifically, deregulation has contributed to the shortening of deposit account maturities at financial Institutions, which inhibits iong-term lending and Introduces Into the system a built-in mismatch of assets...
Page 20 - V. Sawhill areas want to compete to provide services to, and thus become a haven for, the most disadvantaged. If this responsibility is not borne by the federal government, it may not be met at all. Assisting Dislocated Workers— The argument for assisting dislocated workers is based on the possible hardship that plant shutdowns or layoffs may impose on individuals, their families and communities, and on the need to have a mechanism to induce workers to accept technological and other kinds of industrial...
Page 9 - Over the next two decades, the economy will need to generate enough additional jobs to absorb both a growing labor force and the workers whose jobs are displaced by technology and other advances in productivity.
Page 28 - Edward M. Gramlich and Deborah S. Laren, "How Widespread Are Income Losses in a Recession?
Page 19 - ... such shortages could necessitate a reallocation of existing federal training subsidies to technical education programs. There are three arguments which can be made against such a reallocation. The first is that we do not know for sure whether investments in training the more advantaged for high-skill occupations have higher payoffs for society than, say, making a low-income woman heading a family more economically independent. Second, assuming training for the more advantaged does have a higher...
Page 20 - ... incentives exist for state governments and large employers to provide training in skill-shortage occupations but few profit-making organizations or local areas want to compete to provide services, and thus become a haven for, the most disadvantaged. If this responsibility is not borne by the federal government, it may not be met at all. Assisting Dislocated Workers Assisting dislocated workers is important not only because of the possible hardship that plant shutdowns or layoffs may impose on...
Page 51 - ... to be made in Baltimore of the underlying causes of tuberculosis, under the direction of a committee consisting of Dr. Henry Barton Jacobs, Baltimore, president of the Maryland Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis; Dr. Raymond Pearl, professor of biometry and vital statistics in the School of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, and Dr. William T. Howard, Baltimore, assistant commissioner of health. The grant is intended to defray the expense of the investigation...

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