Surface Wear: Analysis, Treatment, and Prevention

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ASM International, 2001 - Technology & Engineering - 307 pages
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Annotation Describes the surface properties controlling the wear processes in different environments, and presents techniques for reducing specific type of wear through modification of surface properties. The author characterizes the energy, morphology, and composition of surfaces, then identifies the mechanisms of wear caused by adhesion, abrasion, erosion, corrosion, and heat. The main section of the book discusses the various surface protection technologies: strain hardening, thermally assisted diffusion processes, hardening by thermal treatment, thin film coatings, and thick film overlays. The final chapters address metal, plastic and ceramic composites that resist wear, and provide a wear diagnosis methodology. Annotation copyrighted by Book News Inc., Portland, OR
 

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Contents

Surface Characterization
1
Surface Energy
2
Surface Morphology
16
Surface Microstructure
25
Surface Composition
39
Surface Hardness
47
Friction Lubrication and Wear of Surfaces
55
Tribology
56
Strain Hardening of Surfaces
144
Thermally Assisted Diffusion Processes
148
Surface Hardening by Thermal Treatment
156
Thin Film Coatings
159
Thick Film Overlays
174
Special Techniques for Protection against Wear
198
WearResistant Materials
203
Ceramic Materials
249

Wear
57
Adhesion
62
Abrasion
72
Erosion
80
Corrosion
90
Thermal Wear
105
Wear Mechanisms
116
Wear of Ceramics and Plastics
126
Surface Protection Technology
143
Polymeric Materials
256
Wear Prognosis Methodology
267
Life Cycle
268
Wear Life
277
Prognosis of Surface Wear
278
Methodologies for Wear Prognosis
282
Economics of SurfacingResurfacing
286
Index
291
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Page 11 - Stresses of this kind are also called microstresses since they vary from one grain to another, or from one part of a grain to another part, on a microscopic scale.
Page 21 - Rz is the height difference of the average of the five highest peaks and the five lowest valleys within a sampling length and therefore also known as the "ten-point
Page 9 - The energy required to form such an unstable high-energy region is the stacking fault energy (SFE) and is defined as the energy required to produce a unit area of hep material four atom layers in thickness.
Page 15 - This relationship can be expressed in the form of the following equation...

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