Survey of Land-grant Colleges and Universities, Volume 1, Issue 8

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Page 679 - One hears that public libraries do not spend enough on books. I would reply that if they spent less on books and more on an educated staff far better results would be obtained.
Page 636 - Bible has yet been noted, but other fifteenth-century books have been requested for reading by large classes. Even recently published periodicals and society publications are to a large extent irreplaceable if worn out. Much valuable material published in out-of-print periodicals and society publications will become very quickly worn out, if used intensively by a considerable number of students. The assignments of volumes of these sets to classes have resulted in the permanent loss of this material,...
Page 674 - Libraries. The Director of Libraries shall appoint all needed assistants and subordinate officers and fix their titles, duties, and compensation provided that the total amount shall not exceed the appropriation of the Trustees for that purpose ; he shall be the custodian of all the property of the Libraries and shall have charge and control of the buildings and rooms containing it; he shall make and enforce by suitable penalties...
Page 615 - Even though a man have as many degrees as a thermometer, even though he be graduated with the highest of honors, he is grossly uneducated if he halts his reading and learning with his graduation. * * * The best thing the university can do for the 'rah rah college man' is to waken in him a zest for thinking and the habit of reading.
Page 688 - In the largest institutions in which research is a major interest the educational qualifications and salaries of heads of library departments should approach more nearly the typical salary of the associate professor. This conclusion, reached upon the basis of the survey returns, is in general accord with the American Library Association " Budget ' classifications and compensation plans.
Page 613 - College men after four years of lecturing are not in the true sense educated men. The most obvious, striking and universal characteristic of the uneducated graduate of the American college is that he does not read books. We have got to stop the lecture procedure, [except of course lecturing about lecturers], and begin our instruction by reading. In my opinion that is the only fundamental method of instruction. I could, of course, add discussion, but I should make even that secondary.
Page 614 - ... authorities appreciate the importance of a well managed library and therefore employ a well-trained and efficient librarian, and have a good library organization. The work of the experiment station may be broadly grouped under the two heads research and the dissemination of the results of that research. A necessary preliminary to all successful research work is the examination of the records of similar or allied work. These records are contained in books and periodicals...
Page 614 - The textbook will no longer suffice. The college library is now generally admitted the sine qua non of scholarship, both academic and professional. If teaching is to be interesting, virile, and commanding, there will have to be a very complete supplementing of its activities by a live and growing library, properly selected, classified, and administered. If the final test of education is to be measured in terms of general intelligence, efficiency, and high ideals of citizenship, then there is a real...
Page 614 - What files of scientific periodicals are needed in a college library successfully to prepare the student for advanced work, taking into consideration also those materials necessary for the stimulation and intellectual development of the...
Page 626 - ... Headley, professor of education at Carleton College, states : Every freshman should make it his early business to find his way among the materials of his college library as much as among the buildings on his campus. A few hours given to a study of the library and its use will save him untold time and anxiety, render more efficient his work in every course, and stamp upon him for life one of the marks of a scholar.

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