Surviving the Great War: Australian Prisoners of War on the Western Front 1916–18

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Cambridge University Press, Nov 12, 2019 - History - 284 pages
Between 1916 and 1918, more than 3,800 men of the Australian Imperial Force were taken prisoner by German forces fighting on the Western Front. Australians captured in France and Belgium did not easily integrate into public narratives of Australia in the First World War and its commemorative rituals. Captivity was a story of surrender and inaction, at odds with the Anzac legend and a triumphant national memory. Soldiers captured on the Western Front endured a broad range of experiences in German captivity, yet all regarded survival as a personal triumph. Surviving the Great War is the first detailed analysis of the little-known story of Australians in German captivity in the First World War. By placing the hardships of prisoners of war in a broader social and military context, this book adds a new dimension to the national wartime experience and challenges popular representations of Australia's involvement in the First World War.
 

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Contents

The capture of Australian troops on
18
Armentières in April 1916
19
Respecting and abrogating wartime
40
of Harbourdin 20 July 1916
42
working behind German lines 1918
63
The intelligence value of Australian
66
Patriotic women prisoners of war and
86
The myth and reality
107
Autonomy
129
Hun haunted? Repatriation home and afterwards
151
Conclusion
174
Australians who died in German captivity
209
Bibliography
240
Index
256
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About the author (2019)

Aaron Pegram is a Senior Historian in the Military History Section at the Australian War Memorial.

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