Swallowdale

Front Cover
J. Cape, 1931 - Juvenile Fiction - 448 pages
"The world that the children enter as soon as they get off the train in the Lake District is as separate from their everyday world as Hogwarts or Narnia... For most readers, the idea of cooking trout you have caught yourself is as strange and poetic as the idea of casting a spell that turns a teacup into a turtle." --Guardian

'Ahoy! Ahoy! Swallows! Ahoy!'

Have you ever sailed in a boat or built a camp? Have you caught trout and cooked it yourself? The four Swallows, John, Susan, Titty and Roger return to the lake full of such plans and they can't wait to meet up with Nancy and Peggy, the Amazon Pirates. When the Swallow is shipwrecked and the Amazon's fearsome Great-Aunt makes decides to make a visit their summer seems ruined. Then they discover a wonderful hidden valley and things take a turn for the better.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Eyejaybee - LibraryThing

The Swallows and Amazons return for another instalment of blissful fun, camping and exploring in the Lake District. A year on from the events chronicled in ‘Swallows and Amazons’, the Walker children ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bostonian71 - LibraryThing

A good follow-up to "Swallows and "Amazons" -- and, for this landlubber, even easier to understand. I love all the adventures and the spunky personalities, as well as the wonderful humor. (The ... Read full review

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About the author (1931)

Arthur Ransome was born in 1884. He was in Russia in 1917 and witnessed the Revolution, which he reported for the Manchester Guardian. After escaping to Scandinavia, he settled in the Lake District of England with his Russian wife where, in 1929, he wrote Swallows and Amazons. Thus began a writing career that has produced some of the best children's literature of all time.

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