Sweet Tooth

Front Cover
Dalkey Archive Press, 1976 - Fiction - 220 pages
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In a New York as gritty and brutal as Charles Bukowski's Los Angeles -- a city of muggings, cockroach-infested apartments, dank hospitals, and casual murders -- three characters cross paths and collide. Sweet Tooth is a book of anonymous sexual encounters and of lust that grades into love: a story by one of the most brilliantly uncompromising innovators of gay literature that shocks with candor and builds to an incredible climax. Its last line -- "Adventure is dead" -- grounds everything that has come before and gives a conclusive, melancholy tone to a book that is much more than shocking.

 

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Sweet Tooth (French Literature)

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Debuting in 1973, Navarre's foreigner's perspective of Manhattan is presented through the shocked eyes of a French journalist who comes to visit a dying friend and receives an introduction to the wicked city's seedy underbelly. Probably more for the lit crowd. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
7
Section 2
17
Section 3
23
Section 4
35
Section 5
41
Section 6
47
Section 7
55
Section 8
61
Section 22
139
Section 23
143
Section 24
147
Section 25
151
Section 26
155
Section 27
161
Section 28
165
Section 29
169

Section 9
69
Section 10
75
Section 11
79
Section 12
85
Section 13
89
Section 14
93
Section 15
99
Section 16
105
Section 17
109
Section 18
115
Section 19
121
Section 20
127
Section 21
133
Section 30
173
Section 31
177
Section 32
179
Section 33
183
Section 34
187
Section 35
191
Section 36
193
Section 37
197
Section 38
201
Section 39
217
Section 40
219
Copyright

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About the author (1976)

Yves Navarre (September 24, 1940 -- January 24, 1994) was a French writer. A gay man, most of his work concerned homosexuality and associated issues, such as AIDS. In his romantic works, Navarre was noted for his tendency to emphasize sensuality and "the mystical qualities of love" rather than sexuality or sensationalism. He was awarded the 1980 Prix Goncourt for his novel Le Jardin d'acclimatation.

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