Sweetness and Blood: How Surfing Spread from Hawaii and California to the Rest of the World, with Some Unexpected Results

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Rodale, May 26, 2011 - Sports & Recreation - 336 pages
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How did an obscure tribal sport from precolonial Hawaii--one that was nearly eliminated by Christian missionaries--jump oceans to California and Australia? And how did it become such a worldwide passion, even in places where the surf may be excellent but the society is highly conservative or superstitious about the sea?

In this brilliantly written travel adventure, journalist (and surfer) Michael Scott Moore visits unlikely surfing destinations--Israel and the Gaza Strip, West Africa, Great Britain, Germany, Indonesia, Japan, Cuba, and Morocco--to find out. Whether he is connecting eccentric surf legend Doc Paskowitz to the Arab-Israeli conflict, trying to deconstruct the terrorist bombing in a nightclub in Bali, or being chased by the German police while surfing a river break in Berlin, Moore masterfully weaves together politics, culture, history, and surfing to create a book like no other.

 

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Contents

INDONESIA
33
GERMANY
67
MOROCCO
95
UNITED KINGDOM
137
ISRAEL AND THE GAZA STRIP
171
CUBA
217
SÃO TOMÉ AND PRÍNCIPE
249
JAPAN
283
BIBLIOGRAPHY
319
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

MICHAEL SCOTT MOORE is a novelist and journalist from California. He was a 2006-2007 Fulbright fellow in Berlin, where he currently works for Spiegel Online and writes a column for Miller-McCune Magazine. His first novel, Too Much of Nothing, was published by Carroll & Graf in 2003. He's written on politics and travel for publications such as The Atlantic Monthly, Slate, and the Financial Times. He's also at work on a second novel.

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