Sword of Allah

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Open Road Media, Jul 17, 2012 - Fiction - 154 pages
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Insane with grief, Sand vows to destroy a terrorist cabal

Ever since he took the vows of the samurai, Robert Sand has been ready to die. But now, for the first time in his life, he has a reason to live. Her name is Ann, and he sits beside her, awaiting takeoff for Geneva, when terrorists seize the plane. Holding guns on the passengers and crew, they douse the cabin in liquor and light a fire that will burn until it reaches the gas tanks. The terrorists flee as smoke fills the plane, but one lingers—a Japanese killer with a vendetta against the black samurai. He puts two bullets in Ann’s back, and even Sand’s lightning reflexes are not fast enough to save her. 

The Sword of Allah, the most feared terrorist organization on the planet, planned the attack. Its next operation threatens to turn the Cold War up to a boil, but they made one foolish mistake. Robert Sand is angry, and will have his revenge.

 

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Contents

FIRE AND DEATH
AN OLD ENEMY
CALIFORNIA DEATH
THE MISSION
LIEUTENANT FOXY AND FRIENDS
UNDERWATER
THE PROPHET DANZIGER
ATTACK
ESCAPE
THREE MEETINGS
TRAP
PREPARATION
CLOSER
SOLUTION
Epilogue
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Marc Olden (1933–2003) was the author of forty novels of mystery and suspense. Born in Baltimore, he began writing while working in New York as a Broadway publicist. His first book, Angela Davis (1973), was a nonfiction study of the controversial Black Panther. In 1973 he also published Narc, under the name Robert Hawke, beginning a hard-boiled nine-book series about a federal narcotics agent.  

A year later, Black Samurai introduced Robert Sand, a martial arts expert who becomes the first non-Japanese student of a samurai master. Based on Olden’s own interest in martial arts, which led him to the advanced ranks of karate and aikido, the novel spawned a successful eight-book series. Olden continued writing for the next three decades, often drawing on his fascination with Japanese culture and history. 

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