Sydney Smith, Volume 1

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Page 204 - Besides the probate, large fees are demanded for burying him in the chancel ; his virtues are handed down to posterity on taxed marble ; and he is then gathered to his fathers — to be taxed no more.
Page 124 - In the winter of 1824, there set in a great flood upon that town — the tide rose to an incredible height — the waves rushed in upon the houses, and everything was threatened with destruction. In the midst of this sublime and...
Page 203 - Taxes on the sauce which pampers man's appetite, and the drug that restores him to health ; on the ermine which decorates the judge, and the rope which hangs the criminal ; on the poor man's salt, and the rich man's spice; on the brass nails of the coffin, and the ribands of the bride.
Page 203 - The schoolboy whips his taxed top; the beardless youth manages his taxed horse, with a taxed bridle, on a taxed road ; and the dying Englishman, pouring his medicine, which has paid...
Page 203 - Jonathan what are the inevitable consequences of being too fond of glory ; — taxes upon every article which enters into the mouth, or covers the back, or is placed under the foot — taxes upon everything which it is pleasant to see, hear, feel, smell, or taste— taxes upon warmth, light, and locomotion — taxes on everything on earth, and the waters under the earth...
Page 5 - Is it wonder, then, that every semi-delirious sectary who pours forth his animated nonsense with the genuine look and voice of passion, should gesticulate away the congregation of the most profound and learned divine of the established church, and in two Sundays preach him bare to the very sexton ? Why are we natural everywhere but in the pulpit?
Page 124 - I do not mean to be disrespectful, but the attempt of the Lords to stop the progress of reform reminds me very forcibly of the great storm of Sidmouth, and of the conduct of the excellent Mrs. Partington on that occasion. In the winter of 1824 there set in a great flood upon that town ; the...
Page 46 - I cannot describe the horror and disgust which I felt at hearing Mr. Perceval call upon the then Ministry for measures of vigour in Ireland. If I lived at Hampstead upon stewed meats and claret; if I walked to church every Sunday before eleven young gentlemen of my own begetting, with their faces washed, and their hair pleasingly combed ; if the Almighty had blessed me with every earthly comfort — how awfully would I pause before I sent...
Page 204 - The proposition is new, Sir ; it is the first time it was ever heard in this House. I am not prepared, Sir, — this House is not prepared, to receive it. The measure implies a distrust of his Majesty's government : their disapproval is sufficient to warrant opposition. Precaution only is requisite where danger is apprehended. Here the high character of the individuals in question is a sufficient guarantee against any ground of alarm.
Page 57 - In short, if it be my lot to crawl, I will crawl contentedly ; if to fly, I will fly with alacrity ; but, as long as I can possibly avoid it, I will never be unhappy.

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