Symbolic Logic: Part I, Elementary, Part 1

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Macmillan, 1896 - Logic, Symbolic and mathematical - 188 pages
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Lewis Carroll the writer of "Through the Looking Glass & what Alice found there" didn't just do fiction; this book on Logic was way ahead of its time.

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I'm enjoying the read , but can't get past a book on logic being digitized by Google , having a typo on pg. 28 .
The typo is written: Similarly we may represent the three similar Propositions " Some
x are y' ", " Some x' are y " , and " Some x are y' " <<< this last example should read: " Some x' are y' " . 

Contents

XVIII
10
XIX
11
XXII
12
XXVII
13
XXX
14
XXXI
15
XXXV
16
XXXVI
17
XLIII
18
XLVII
21
XLIX
22
L
23
LI
24
LII
25
LIII
26
LVI
27
LX
28
LXIV
29
LXIX
30
LXXI
31
LXXV
32
LXXVIII
33
LXXX
34
LXXXII
35
LXXXIII
36
LXXXIV
37
LXXXVII
38
LXXXIX
39
XC
40
XCII
41
XCVI
43
XCVII
44
C
45
CIII
46
CIV
47
CV
48
CVI
49
CVII
50
CVIII
51
CXI
54
CXIV
55
CXV
57
CXVIII
58
CXXI
60
CL
77
CLI
78
CLII
79
CLIV
82
CLVI
83
CLIX
85
CLX
86
CLXIV
87
CLXV
88
CLXVIII
89
CLXXII
92
CLXXIV
93
CLXXV
95
CLXXVI
96
CLXXVII
98
CLXXXII
99
CLXXXIII
100
CLXXXV
101
CLXXXVI
102
CLXXXVIII
107
CXC
108
CXCII
111
CXCIV
113
CXCVI
125
CXCVIII
126
CXCIX
127
CC
128
CCI
130
CCII
131
CCIII
132
CCIV
134
CCVII
136
CCX
138
CCXI
141
CCXII
144
CCXIII
146
CCXV
148
CCXVI
150
CCXVII
155
CCXVIII
157
CCXIX
164
CCXX
186
CCXXI
187

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Page 124 - Brown. 60 (1) The only animals in this house are cats; (2) Every animal is suitable for a pet, that loves to gaze at the moon; (3) When I detest an animal, I avoid it; (4) No animals are carnivorous, unless they prowl at night; (5) No cat fails to kill mice; (6) No animals ever take to me, except what are in this house; (7) Kangaroos are not suitable for pets; (8) None but carnivora kill mice; (9) I detest animals that do not take to me; (10) Animals, that prowl at night, always love to gaze at the...
Page xiv - ... interest, and one that will be of real use to you in any subject you may take up. It will give you clearness of thought — the ability to see your way through a puzzle — the habit of arranging your ideas in an orderly and getat-able form — and, more valuable than all, the power to detect fallacies, and to tear to pieces the flimsy illogical arguments, which you will so continually encounter in books, in newspapers, in speeches, and even in sermons, and which so easily delude those who have...
Page 165 - I maintain that any writer of a book is fully authorised in attaching any meaning he likes to any word or phrase he intends to use. If I find an author saying, at the beginning of his book, "Let it be understood that by the word 'black' I shall always mean 'white', and that by the word 'white' I shall always mean 'black'," I meekly accept his ruling, however injudicious I may think it.
Page xiii - ... may, however, preface what follows with this advice taken from CL Dodgson: "When you come to any passage you don't understand, read it again: if you still don't understand it, read it again: if you fail, even after three readings, very likely your brain is getting a little tired. In that case, just put the book away, and take to other occupations, and next day, when you come to it fresh, you will very likely find that it is quite easy.
Page 119 - Wonderland:(l) 1 . No kitten, that loves fish, is unteachable. 2. No kitten without a tail will play with a gorilla. 3. Kittens with whiskers always love fish. 4. No teachable kitten has green eyes. 5. No kittens have tails unless they have whiskers.
Page 164 - The writers, and editors, of the Logical text-books which run in the ordinary grooves to whom I shall hereafter refer by the (I hope inoffensive) title " The Logicians " take, on this subject, what seems to me to be a more humble position than is at all necessary. They speak of the Copula of a Proposition "with bated breath...
Page 115 - acrobatic feats"; a = announced in the bills of a circus; b = attempted in a circus; c = involving the turning of a quadruple somersault; d = possible. 23 (1) Nobody, who really appreciates Beethoven, fails to keep silence while the Moonlight-Sonata is being played; (2) Guinea-pigs are hopelessly ignorant of music; (3) No one, who is hopelessly ignorant of music, ever keeps silence while the Moonlight-Sonata is being played. Univ. "creatures...
Page xiv - Once master the machinery of Symbolic Logic, and you have a mental occupation always at hand, of absorbing interest, and one that will be of real use to you in any subject you may take up.
Page 173 - It must be admitted that such a diagram is not quite so simple to draw as one might wish it to be; but then consider what the alternative is if one undertakes to deal with five terms and all their combinations — nothing short of the disagreeable task of writing out, or in some way putting before us, all the 32 combinations involved.
Page 113 - Conclusions to be found. (1) Babies are illogical; (2) Nobody is despised who can manage a crocodile; (3) Illogical persons are despised. Univ. "persons"; a = able to manage a crocodile; b = babies; c = despised; d = logical.

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