Symbolic Interactionism: Perspective and Method

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University of California Press, 1986 - Social Science - 208 pages
5 Reviews
This is a collection of articles dealing with the point of view of symbolic interactionism and with the topic of methodology in the discipline of sociology. It is written by the leading figure in the school of symbolic interactionism, and presents what might be regarded as the most authoritative statement of its point of view, outlining its fundamental premises and sketching their implications for sociological study. Blumer states that symbolic interactionism rests on three premises: that human beings act toward things on the basis of the meanings of things have for them; that the meaning of such things derives from the social interaction one has with one's fellows; and that these meanings are handled in, and modified through, an interpretive process.
 

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User Review  - jorgearanda - LibraryThing

Although I find myself mostly in agreement with Blumer's methodological and philosophical positions, I did not find this collection of papers fully satisfying nor informative. Blumer spends perhaps ... Read full review

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please help me with the links to download this particular book.
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Contents

I
1
II
61
III
78
IV
90
V
101
VI
117
VII
127
VIII
140
IX
153
X
171
XI
183
XII
195
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About the author (1986)

Herbert George Blumer earned his doctorate in 1928 at the University of Chicago and went on to teach there until 1951. He later became the founding chair of the Department of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. In 1983 the American Sociological Association honored him with its Career of Distinguished Scholarship Award, acknowledging the importance of his codification of the fundamental theoretical and methodological tenets of the sociological perspective that he called symbolic interactionism.

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