Systems Theory and Family Therapy: A Primer

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University Press of America, 1999 - Psychology - 129 pages
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Systems Theory and Family Therapy describes the basic concepts of systems theory and its application in family therapy in a clear, understandable manner with many illustrations drawn from clinical practice. This edition provides a revised and updated version of the original, that simplifies a complex area of study, enabling students to learn the subject more easily without being overwhelmed by the language normally employed in presenting these subjects. The authors discuss the distinctions between modernism and postmodernism as well as first-order and second-order cybernetics. They also include discussions of constructivism and social constructionism, as well as the ramifications of these perspectives for the theory and practice of family therapy.
 

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This review is not for this book rather another Becvar book I am reading.
I find Becvar book confusing. There is an overuse of words such as "punctuate" which after a while is annoying. Becvar goes
in circles and takes a long time to get to the point. In defining cybernetics of cybernetics in one of the chapters there is no mention that it is related to second order of cybernetics not even in the summary while first order is equated to simple cybernetics. This amongst so many other errors makes this text book confounding. 

Contents

ABOUT THEORIES
1
SYSTEMS THEORYCYBERNETICS A PARADIGM SHIFT
5
Modernism
8
Postmodernism
9
Constructivism
10
FirstOrder and SecondOrder Cybernetics
11
FIRSTORDER CYBERNETICS DEFINITIONS OF CONCEPTS
13
Boundaries
15
SECONDORDER CYBERNETICS DEFINTION OF CONCEPTS
35
Autopoiesis
37
Epistemology of Participation
38
NonPurposeful Drift
39
Reality as a Multiverse
40
Structural Determiniam
41
Summary and Conclusion
42
FAMILY INTERPRETIVE SYSTEMSSTORIES
43

Communication Information Processing
16
Context
19
Entropy and Negative Entropy
20
Equifinality
21
HomeostasisMorphostasis and Morphogenesis
22
Open and Closed Systems
23
Positive and Negative Feedback
24
Recursion
27
Relationship
28
Wholeness
31
Summary and Conclusion
33
FAMILY DEVELOPMENT THROUGH THE LIFE CYCLE
51
THE FAMILY AS SYSTEM
69
A CRITIQUE AND DEFENSE OF THE SYSTEMS PERSPECTIVE
75
IMPLICATIONS FOR FAMILY THERAPY
83
General Principles
89
Engaging the Family Assessment and Therapeutic Goals
97
Pragmatics
104
IN CONCLUSION
117
REFERENCES
119
Index
125
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About the author (1999)

Dorothy S. Becvar is a Family Therapist in Private Practice and former Associate Professor at Radford University, Virginia.
Raphael J. Becvar is Professor and Hanna Spyker Eminent Scholars Endowed Chair in Marriage and Family Therapy at St. Louis University and is an Individual, Marriage, and Family Therapist in Private Practice.

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