The Strange Truth of Fiction: A Series of Short Stories, Tragic and Humorous Set in Malta and Abroad

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Author House, Feb 13, 2013 - Biography & Autobiography - 262 pages
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The author turns true experiences into stories that adorn his biographies and autobiographies. He does so as a means of information, instruction and discussion. In fact he provides authentic insights of the human predicament in a universe that is sometimes friendly, sometimes hostile but often indifferent. He also delineates the human aspect in realistic living characters. The narration of many incidents and accidents is woven into his stories reinforced by imaginative fiction. True tragic incidents are both intensely dramatic and highly emotional. They engender sympathy and empathy that imprints them as true to life. On the other hand, comic episodes in the life of the characters stimulate humour, an element of pleasant relief and entertainment. True or imaginary they embellish the literary world by allowing the readers' participation in adventures of ordinary people. Personal experiences encompass man's journey on earth, no matter how colourless and humdrum is his life. However man's physical activities, such as travels to nearby or to distant countries, enrich life experiences. In addition, man's thought, stimulated by philosophical dicta, makes him aware of the hidden truths of his universal role. As a human being, Man is subject to superior forces. He is buffeted by coincidences, destiny, misfortune and even Providence. Though this collection of stories may encapsulate a short span of a man's life, they are in essence true to life. Though plot may be coloured by imaginative fiction, the stories are characteristic of a true narration and a recording of what truly happened. Thus, the reader should evaluate the story by its truth rather than by other characteristic structures. Nevertheless, the author considers these stories more as a literature of escape than of interpretation. Yet they broaden the readers' vision and sharpen their awareness of the everyday reality of life. The stories are certainly true to life. They illustrate various reactions and other aspects of human behaviour,
 

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Contents

THOSE WERE THE DAYS MY FRIEND
1
LOVE IS A MANY SPLENDORED THING
25
WE DONT NEED NO EDUCATION
51
ONLY IN LIBYA
75
OH MY MAMA TO ME SHE WAS SO WONDERFUL
91
ONCE I HAD A SECRET LOVE
109
NEIGHBOURS
129
A DISTORTED PORTRAIT OF AN ECCENTRIC FAMILY
153
MUGGED
175
THE PAINS OF PLEASURE
199
AMANDA
223
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Joe Bugeja was born in Floriana in 1930. The eldest of a working class family of ten children who experienced the relative poverty of those times. His early education followed the normal paths available in those days of British rule in Malta. He attended the course of Primary School education in Floriana. Competitive examinations earned him a scholarship and admittance into the Lyceum. In 1947 aged seventeen, he attended the newly opened St. Michael’s Teachers Training College at Ta’ Gorni in St. Julian’s. In 1960, he embarked on an academic career: he earned a B.A. (Hons) in 1964 and M.A. in 1966, both in English Literature. In 1973, he also read sociology and political science obtaining M.Litt., a post graduate degree, from Oxford University in England. His teaching career spanned forty-eight years in Qormi and Floriana Primary Schools, the Lyceum, the Junior College, the College of Arts, Science and Technology and the Royal University of Malta. He also dedicated his young days to sports activities. He was a playing member on the books of Floriana Football Club. He also played Cricket, Hockey, Badminton and Tennis. He is now a member of the Royal Malta Golf Club. Presently, he is the Chairman of the Historical Society of Floriana. In his retirement, he dedicated times to historical research and writing. Joe Bugeja is married to Candida Camilleri. Both parents are proud of their two sons, Christopher and Bernard and their five grandchildren.

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