T. Macci Plavti Captivi

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Allyn and Bacon, 1900 - 173 pages
 

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Page xvi - ... comedies have come down to us — not even in fragments of any importance. The next poet worthy of mention in this connection is Statins Caecilius, who enjoyed an enviable reputation among the ancients as a writer of palliatae, and who was an important forerunner of Terence. An Insubrian by birth, he came to Rome about 194 BC, probably as a captive taken in war. Later, however, he was given his freedom. His first attempt at comedy failed and was not even heard to the end by the impatient audience;...
Page xlvi - Phorm. 209 quld hie conterimus to quld hle conterimus; It is important to note, however, that in such cases the long syllable may be shortened only when the short syllable immediately preceding begins a word. The shortening, furthermore, seems to take place only in the following cases : (1) In a dissyllabic iambic word1; (2) In a monosyllabic word (or one that has become such by elision) preceded by a short monosyllable (or a word which has become such by elision) ; (3) In the first syllable of a...
Page xxix - An exception to this rule must, however, be made in the case of the mimes (mimi), in which the female parts were really taken by women. It is needless to say that these women, like all the other actors in mimes, were in very bad repute. The custom of using masks seems to have been introduced soon after Terence by the theatrical managers, Cincius Faliscus and Minucius Prothymus. Up to that time actors depended for their effects upon wigs and rouge. The plot in the fabula palliata is invariably laid...
Page xvi - ... books, the entire history of Rome from the earliest times down to his own — for his saturae, and his tragedies. But he also attempted comedy, and so deserves mention here. He was born at Rudiae in Calabria in 239 BC He was brought to Rome from Sardinia in 204 by the quaestor M. Porcius Cato, and here he seems to have lived in moderate circumstances as teacher of Greek and as stage poet. In 184 BC he received the right of Roman citizenship which he lived to enjoy for fifteen years. None of his...
Page 55 - Stein bruch bringen. Philocrates kehrt mit Hegios anderem Sohn Philopolemus zurück und bittet um Rückgabe seines Sklaven, quem hie reliqueram pignus pro me qui mihi melior quam sibi semper fuit, pro benefactis eius ut (e}i pretium possim reddere (938sqq.). Als er von der Strafe erfährt, bricht er in den Ruf aus:vo« misero mihi: propter meum caput labores homini evenisse optumo] (945 sq.). Von Hetärenfreundschaft gibt Plautus' Cistellaria Kunde, der Menanders ZvvaQKSTffiaai zugrunde liegen.
Page xl - ... most of these metres are sometimes used where the above-mentioned characteristics are not prominent. The moods indicated are, in each case, to be regarded merely as those most frequently associated with the verse. Differences in the Manner of Rendering Various Rhythms ; Musical Accompaniment, etc. A change in the character of the verse was often accompanied also by a corresponding change in the manner of presenting the scene. With reference to the differences in the manner of presentation, the...
Page 138 - ... now" has in certain colloquial expressions, eg, "He did not say so at all, now," eg 626 ; Hec. 788, 873 ; Plaut. Pers. 218. 378. adulescens: this word, when used as here in direct address, often implies condescension and a certain amount of contempt; cf. the similar use of "young man." aba : a form confined (except in compounds) almost exclusively to its combination with te. Even in this combination, it was almost entirely supplanted, in the last years of the Ciceronian period, by a. Later, when...
Page xxvii - It was capable of accommodating forty thousand spectators. The dramatic performances usually took place between prandium (about twelve o'clock) and cena (after three o'clock), so that when we consider the other amusements that formed a part of the day's exercises, it seems hardly possible that more than one play could, as a rule, have been presented on any one day. Later, in Cicero's time, the custom of giving these performances in the early morning was introduced. When the ludi scaenici were to...
Page xv - ... he is one of the world's greatest humorists, who besides being immensely popular in his own day, has exerted a powerful influence on the literature of modern times. A noble tribute to his genius is the epitaph, in dactylic hexameters...
Page xxviii - ... 214 f.) for the manner in which he put the Epidicus on the stage. To these theatrical managers application was made by those who wished to give dramatic entertainments. The poets had business relations, for the most part, only with the actores, who bought, or rejected, their plays, and these actores accordingly were very influential in determining the fate and encouraging the development of poetic talent. In exceptional cases, however, the givers of the games, as they were men of experience in...

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