Tables of the Results of a Series of Experiments on the Strength of British Colonial and Other Woods: Exhibited at the International Exhibition, 1862 ...

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H.M. Stationery Office, 1867 - 345 pages
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Page 286 - The testing machine consisted of a hydraulic press with the piston-rod furnished with a eross-head, working horizontally in cast-iron guides, and having a connecting rod attached to it reaching to the end of the guides ; a small valve in the cylinder, furnished with a steelyard and moveable weight, gave the means of ascertaining to a great nicety the exact amount of pressure applied.
Page 286 - The former is often merely a blemish, affecting the appearance rather than the utility of the timber ; but the latter, when occurring frequently in the same section of the trunk, renders it comparatively worthless, excepting for fuel. In the latter case, as the wood dries, the layers with gum veins interposing separate from each other ; and it is consequently impracticable to take from trees so affected a sound piece of timber, excepting of very small dimensions. The whole of the species of Angophora,...
Page 300 - ... colony. There appears to be a variety, the heart of which is not mottled, and this the Indians are said to prefer to the other for their bows. Wamara. A scarce tree, attaining a great height, but the only part used is the heart, which is dark brown and often streaked. Its hardness and weight cause it to be preferred by the Indians for their war-clubs : it may be had from 6 to 12 inches square, and from 20 to 40 feet long.
Page 305 - Wallaba," produces a strong and valuable wood of a deep red colour ; it is hard and heavy, but splits freely and smoothly, and is much used for shingles, staves, palings, posts, house-frames &c. It is impregnated with a resinous oil, which makes it very durable both in and out of water. A roof well shingled with this wood will last more that forty years.
Page 286 - Gum vein," and consists simply in the extravasation, in greater or less quantity, of the gum resin of the tree in particular spots, amongst the fibres of woody tissue, and probably where some injury has been sustained ; or, which is a much greater evil, in concentric circles between successive layers of the wood. The former is often merely a blemish, affecting the appearance rather than the utility of the timber ; but the latter, when occurring frequently in the same section of the trunk, renders...
Page 296 - The importance of the Mora in Naval Architecture, is now fully recognised in Great Britain, and a new export trade has been opened to the Colony. At the upper Barima this tree is so abundant, and grows to such a size, that the whole British navy might be reconstructed merely from the trees which line its banks...
Page 286 - ... are to be found in the greatest perfection at Illawarra, a few miles from the open seacoast, upon natural terraces skirting the mountain side at various elevations, up to 1,500 feet, and upon rich alluvial plains, particularly in the districts to the northward of Sydney, where they are described to be of great continuous extent. They produce few shrubs, but a variety of trees of considerable altitude, frequently of comparatively slender growth, almost...
Page 307 - This tree is plentiful, grows tall and straight, and may be cut from 40 to 60 feet in length, with a square of 14 or 16 inches. The wood is light, and, as it takes a high polish, makes excellent furniture. It is also much used for floors, partitions, and doors in the houses of the wealthy. Masts and spars are formed of it, and it is sometimes employed for sugar hogsheads, and even for shingles, as it splits freely and smoothly. There are two varieties, Bed and White. The seeds yield ' Crab Oil,'...
Page 296 - Navy might be reconstructed merely from the trees which line its banks, a circumstance well worth consideration, especially as being near a river which is navigable to vessels of twelve feet draught, the craft intended for the transport of the timber might load at the very spot where the trees are cut down. It is only lately that the timber of Guiana has come into notice in England ; but so superior is the Mora and the Greenheart for objects of naval architecture that a higher price is given for...
Page 296 - ... of great weight, hardness and solidity, of a beautiful deep red, variegated with black spots of different size and figure, which give rise to its name. It is susceptible of a brilliant polish ; but the small size of the mottled part, and its great value even in the colony, limits its use almost entirely to veneering, to picture -frames, to some smaller pieces of furniture, and to walking-sticks.

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