Tahiti: A Series of Photographs

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Sampson Low, Marston, Searle, and Rivington, 1882 - Tahiti - 68 pages
 

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Page 12 - There with its waving blade of green. The sea-flag streams through the silent water, And the crimson leaf of the dulse is seen To blush, like a banner bathed in slaughter: There with a light and easy motion, The fan-coral Sweeps through the clear deep sea; And the yellow and scarlet tufts of ocean Are bending like corn on the upland lea: And life, in rare and beautiful forms.
Page 12 - And life, in rare and beautiful forms, Is sporting amid those bowers of stone, And is safe when the wrathful spirit of storms Has made the top of the wave his own...
Page 3 - Seen from the sea, the prospect is magnificent. It is one mass of shaded tints of green, from beach to mountain top ; endlessly diversified with valleys, ridges, glens, and cascades. Over the ridges, here and there, the loftier peaks fling their shadows, and far down the valleys. At the head of these, the water-falls flash out into the sunlight, as if pouring through vertical bowers of verdure. Such enchantment, too, breathes over the whole, that it seems a fairy world, all fresh and blooming from...
Page 8 - The wish — which ages have not yet subdued In man — to have no master save his mood ;' The earth, whose mine was on its face, unsold, The glowing sun and produce all its gold; The freedom which can call each grot a home ; The general garden, where all steps may roam, Where Nature owns a nation as her child, Exulting in the enjoyment of the wild...
Page 12 - ... and flashing in and out ; shells, every one of which was fit to hold the place of honour in a conchologist's collection, moving slowly along with their living inmates : this is what we saw when we looked down, from the side of the boat, into the depths below. The surface of the water glittered with every imaginable tint, from the palest aquamarine to the brightest emerald, from the pure light blue of the turquoise to the deep dark blue of the sapphire, and was dotted here and there with patches...
Page 57 - ... embalms the bodies of the dead. The noble trunk itself is far from being valueless. Sawn into posts, it upholds the islander's dwelling; converted into charcoal, it cooks his food; and supported on blocks of stone, rails in his lands.
Page 57 - Year after year, the islander reposes beneath its shade, both eating and drinking of its fruit; he thatches his hut with its boughs, and weaves them into baskets to carry his food; he cools himself with a fan...
Page 57 - ... from the young leaflets, and shields his head from the sun by a bonnet of the leaves; sometimes he clothes himself with the cloth-like substance which wraps round the base of the stalks, whose elastic rods...
Page 56 - GATHER ye rose-buds while ye may, Old time is still a flying, And this same flower that smiles to-day, To-morrow will be dying. The glorious lamp of Heaven, the sun, The higher he's a getting, The sooner will his race be run, And neerer he's to setting.

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