Taiichi Ohnos Workplace Management: Special 100th Birthday Edition

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McGraw Hill Professional, Dec 13, 2012 - Business & Economics - 208 pages
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COMMEMORATING THE 100th BIRTHDAY OF TAIICHI OHNO

Businesses worldwide are successfully implementing the Toyota Production System to speed up processes, reduce waste, improve quality, and cut costs. While there is widespread adoption of TPS, there is still much to be learned about its fundamental principles.

This unique volume delivers a clear, concise overview of the Toyota Production System and kaizen in the very words of the architect of both of these movements, Taiicho Ohno, published to mark what would have been his 100th birthday. Filled with insightful new commentary from global quality visionaries, Taiichi Ohno’s Workplace Management is a classic that shows how Toyota managers were taught to think.

Based on a series of interviews with Ohno himself, this timeless work is a tribute to his genius and to the core values that have made, and continue to make, Toyota one of the most successful manufacturers in the world.

"Whatever name you may give our system, there are parts of it that are so far removed from generally accepted ideas (common sense) that if you do it only half way, it can actually make things worse."

"If you are going to do TPS you must do it all the way. You also need to change the way you think. You need to change how you look at things." -- Taiichi Ohno

"This book brings to us Taiichi Ohno's philosophy of workplace management--the thinking behind the Toyota Production System. I personally get a thrill down my spine to read these thoughts in Ohno’s own words." -- Dr. Jeffrey Liker, Director, Japan Technology Management Program, University of Michigan, and Author, The Toyota Way

Based on a series of interviews with Taiicho Ohno, this unique volume delivers a clear, concise overview of the Toyota Production System and kaizen in the very words of the architect of both of these movements, published to mark what would have been his 100th birthday.

INCLUDES INSIGHTFUL NEW COMMENTARY FROM:
Fujio Cho, Chairman of Toyota Corporation
Masaaki Imai, Founder of the Kaizen Institute
Dr. Jeffrey Liker, Director, Japan Technology Management Program, University of Michigan, and author
John Shook, Chairman and CEO of the Lean Enterprise Institute
Bob Emiliani, Professor, School of Engineering and Technology, Connecticut State University
Jon Miller, CEO of the Kaizen Institute

 

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User Review  - ericschmitz - LibraryThing

This book is - as mentioned bij others - a remarkable object, coming from one of the founder fathers of Toyota's Lean Adventure. The book is not written by him, but is the result of several ... Read full review

Contents

Chapter 1 The Wise Mend Their Ways
1
Chapter 2 If You Are Wrong Admit It
5
Chapter 3 Misconceptions Reduce Efficiency
9
Chapter 4 Confirm Failures with Your Own Eyes
13
Chapter 5 Misconceptions Hidden within Common Sense
17
Chapter 6 The Blind Spot in Mathematical Calculations
21
Chapter 7 Dont Fear Opportunity Losses
25
Chapter 8 Limited Volume Production Is to Produce at a Low Cost
29
Chapter 27 We Can Still Do a Lot More Kaizen
101
Chapter 28 Wits Dont Work Until You Feel the Squeeze
103
Chapter 29 Become a Reliable Boss
107
Chapter 30 Sort Set in Order Sweep Sanitize
111
Chapter 31 There Is a Correct Sequence to Kaizen
115
Chapter 32 Operational Availability vs Rate of Operation
121
Chapter 33 The Difference between Production Engineering and Manufacturing Engineering
125
Chapter 34 The Pitfall of Cost Calculation
129

Chapter 9 Reduced Inventory Increased Work in Process
31
Chapter 10 The Misconception That Mass Production Is Cheaper
35
Chapter 11 Wasted Motion Is Not Work
39
Chapter 12 Agricultural People Like Inventory
43
Chapter 13 Improve Productivity Even with Reduced Volumes
47
Chapter 14 Do Kaizen When Times Are Good
51
Chapter 15 Just in Time
55
Chapter 16 Old Man Sakichi Toyodas Jidoka Idea
59
Chapter 17 The Goal Was Tenfold Higher Productivity
63
Chapter 18 The Supermarket System
67
Chapter 19 Toyota Made the Kanban System Possible
71
Chapter 20 We Learned Forging Changeover at Toyota do Brasil
75
Chapter 21 Rationalization Is to Do What Is Rational
79
Chapter 22 Shut the Machines Off
83
Chapter 23 How to Produce at a Lower Cost
87
Chapter 24 Fight the Robot Fad
91
Chapter 25 Work Is a Competition of Wits with Subordinates
95
Chapter 26 There Are No Supervisors at the Administrative Gemba
97
Chapter 35 The Monaka System
133
Chapter 36 Only the Gemba Can Do Cost Reduction
137
Chapter 37 Follow the Decisions That Were Made
141
Chapter 38 The Standard Time Should Be the Shortest Time
145
Afterword
149
About the Author
151
Seeking What Taiichi Ohno Sought
153
Ohnos Insights on Human Nature
157
A Revolution in Consciousness
163
Taiichi Ohno as Master Trainer
167
Reflections on the Centenary of Taiichi Ohno
171
Selected Sayings of Taiichi Ohno
175
A Note on Translation from Japanese to English
181
Index
183
About Kaizen Institute
191
Worldwide Contact Information for Kaizen Institute Consulting Group
193
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Taiichi Ohno was born in Dalian, China, on February 29, 1912. He joined Toyoda Boshoku in 1932 after graduating from the mechanical engineering department of Nagoya Technical High School. Mr. Ohno was transferred to Toyota Motor Company in 1943 and was named the machine shop manager in 1949. He was promoted at Toyota to director in 1954, managing director in 1964, senior managing director in 1970, and executive vice president in 1975. He retired from Toyota in 1978. Mr. Ohno is the father of the Toyota Production System. He authored three works: Toyota Production System: Beyond Large-Scale Production, Taiichi Ohno's Workplace Management, and Just-in-Time for Today and Tomorrow with Setsuo Mito.

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