Tainted Truth: The Manipulation of Fact In America

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Simon and Schuster, Jan 25, 1996 - Business & Economics - 272 pages
Sponsored studies have become America's most powerful and popular tool of persuasion. Tainted Truth shows that much of what we learn from them is false. Although the studies and surveys wear the guise of objective science, their findings almost invariably reflect their sponsors' intentions.
In this important and provocative book, Cynthia Crossen reveals how the manufacturers of silicone breast implants did not disclose information regarding the dangers of the implants, how the demise of the cloth-diaper industry was influenced by questionable statistics paid for by Procter & Gamble—the leading supplier of disposable diapers, and how even the confirmation of Clarence Thomas to the Supreme Court was influenced by fast and biased polls.
 

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TAINTED TRUTH: The Manipulation of Fact in America

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A Wall Street Journal reporter skeptical of the rise in privately sponsored research traverses a host of cautionary examples. ``We need to reclaim the purity of our numbers,'' declares Crossen, and ... Read full review

Tainted truth: the manipulation of fact in America

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Crossen, a Wall Street Journal editor, confirms what the current debate on healthcare demonstrates so clearly: that sophistry is alive and well in this country. It is not just that we are surrounded ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
7
Chapter
39
THE NUMERICAL LIES OF ADVERTISING
70
Chapter Five
129
Chapter Eight
251
Select Bibliography
253
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Cynthia Crossen has been a reporter and editor at The Wall Street Journal since 1983. She lives in Brooklyn, New York, with her husband and son.

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