Tales

Front Cover
D.M. Mac Lellan Book Company, 1908 - 344 pages
2 Reviews
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Lyndatrue - LibraryThing

I'm ambivalent on the New Pocket Library collection of books. The introductions are nice, but every time I see that Moffett has "revised" the book, I wonder what it was he found necessary to change. I ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - TamBrock - LibraryThing

An excellent collection of classic Poe literature, known as the the "official" text. This includes classics such as The Tell-Tale Heart and The Pit and the Pendulum. A great read for anyone interested in great literary genius. Read full review

Contents

I
11
II
24
III
45
IV
57
V
68
VI
79
VII
91
VIII
101
XVII
193
XVIII
200
XIX
210
XX
217
XXI
226
XXII
233
XXIII
242
XXIV
251

IX
113
X
124
XI
131
XII
140
XIII
152
XIV
167
XV
179
XVI
185
XXV
261
XXVI
272
XXVII
296
XXVIII
312
XXIX
326
XXX
332
Copyright

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Page 282 - And the seraphs sob at vermin fangs In human gore imbued. Out - out are the lights - out all! And over each quivering form, The curtain, a funeral pall, Comes down with the rush of a storm, And the angels, all pallid and wan, Uprising, unveiling, affirm That the play is the tragedy, 'Man,' And its hero the Conqueror Worm.
Page 272 - And the will therein lieth, which dieth not. Who knoweth the mysteries of the will, with its vigor? For God is but a great will pervading all things by nature of its intentness. Man doth not yield himself to the angels, nor unto death utterly, save only through the weakness of his feeble will.
Page 285 - ... vaulting, depended, by a single chain of gold with long links, a huge censer of the same metal, Saracenic in pattern, and with many perforations so contrived that there writhed in and out of them, as if endued with a serpent vitality, a continual succession of particolored fires. Some few ottomans and golden candelabra, of Eastern figure, were in various stations about — and there was the couch, too — the bridal couch — of an Indian model, and low, and sculptured of solid ebony, with a...
Page 273 - Ligeia, that I bring before mine eyes in fancy the image of her who is no more. And now, while I write, a recollection flashes upon me that I have never known the paternal name of her who was my friend and my betrothed, and who became the partner of my studies, and finally the wife of my bosom.
Page 289 - I remembered where was deposited a decanter of light wine which had been ordered by her physicians, and hastened across the chamber to procure it. But, as I stepped beneath the light of the censer, two circumstances of a startling nature attracted my attention. I had felt that some palpable although invisible object had passed lightly by my person; and I saw that there lay upon the golden carpet, in the very middle of the rich lustre thrown from the censer, a shadow —a faint, indefinite shadow...
Page 278 - Of all the women whom I have ever known, she, the outwardly calm, the ever-placid Ligeia, was the most violently a prey to the tumultuous vultures of stern passion. And of such passion I could form no estimate, save by the miraculous expansion of those eyes which at once so delighted and appalled me, by the almost magical melody, modulation, distinctness, and placidity of her very low voice...
Page 272 - I CANNOT, for my soul, remember how, when, or even precisely where, I first became acquainted with the lady Ligeia. Long years have since elapsed, and my memory is feeble through much suffering.
Page 25 - ... lifetime dragged out in sorrow and tears, upon some gray and desolate rock, in an ocean unapproachable and unknown. Such visions or desires- for they amounted to desires- are common, I have since been assured, to the whole numerous race of the melancholy among men- at the time of which I speak I regarded them only as prophetic glimpses of a destiny which I felt myself in a measure bound to fulfil. Augustus thoroughly entered into my state of mind. It is probable, indeed, that our intimate communion...
Page 293 - ... she who had been dead once again stirred — and now more vigorously than hitherto, although arousing from a dissolution more appalling in its utter hopelessness than any. I had long ceased to struggle or to move, and remained sitting rigidly upon the ottoman, a helpless prey to a whirl of violent emotions, of which extreme awe was perhaps the least terrible, the least consuming.
Page 281 - That motley drama!- oh, be sure It shall not be forgot! With its Phantom chased for evermore, By a crowd that seize it not, Through a circle that ever returneth in To the self-same spot; And much of Madness, and more of Sin And Horror, the soul of the plot!

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