Tales from Grimm

Front Cover
Coward, McCann & Geoghegan, 1981 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 237 pages
1 Review
Retells the stories of Hansel and Gretel, the Musicians of Bremen, Cinderella, Rapunzel, the Fisherman and his wife, and the Frog Prince

What people are saying - Write a review

TALES FROM GRIMM

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

A careful selection, including such favorites as Hansel and Gretel, Rose White and Snow Red and omitting the gruesome ones which deter some parents from giving Grimm to their children. Over 150 line ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - MaowangVater - LibraryThing

Summary: An illustrated collection of sixteen tales, including "Hansel and Gretel" and "Rapunzel." Read full review

Contents

CAT AND MOUSE KEEP HOUSE
27
SIX SERVANTS
39
SPINDLE SHUTTLE AND NEEDLE
65
DOCTOR KNOWITALL
77
THE MUSICIANS OF BREMEN
87
CINDERELLA
101
CLEVER ELSIE
123
RAPUNZEL
135
THE THREE BROTHERS
171
THE FROG PRINCE
179
LAZY HEINZ
191
LEAN LIESL AND LANKY LENZ
201
SNOWWHITEANDROSERED
207
GRANDMOTHER
225
IN CASE YOU WANT TO KNOW
235
Copyright

THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE
149

Other editions - View all

About the author (1981)

A highly touted writer and illustrator of children's picture books, Gag was born in New Ulm, Minnesota, to Anton Gag, also an artist, and Lisse Gag. She married Earle Marshall Humphreys in 1930. She studied art at the St. Paul Institute of Arts, the Minneapolis School of Art, and the Art Students League in New York City. Gag began her career illustrating for the children's section of the Minneapolis Journal; first had her works exhibited at the Weyrhe Gallery, New York City, 1926; and created the text and drawings for her most famous work, Millions of Cats, in 1928. The book was a runner-up for the John Newbery Medal in 1929, won first prize at the Philadelphia Lithograph Show in 1930, and won the Lewis Carroll Shelf Award in 1958. Other important works include ABC Bunny (1933), another runner-up for the Newbery award in 1934; Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, a runner-up for the Caldecott award in 1939; and Nothing at All, also a runner-up for the Caldecott award in 1942. In 1993, the centennial of her birth was celebrated with special exhibits of her art and a number of evaluative articles.

Jacob W. Grimm (1785-1863) and his brother Wilhelm K. Grimm (1786-1859) pioneered the study of German philosophy, law, mythology and folklore, but they are best known for their collection of fairy tales. These include such popular stories as Red Riding Hood, Sleeping Beauty and The Frog Prince. Commonly referred to now as Grimm's Fairy Tales, their collection was published as Kinder-und-Hausmarchen (Children's and Household Tales, 1812-15). The brothers were born thirteen months apart in the German province of Hesse, and were inseparable from childhood. Throughout their lives they showed a marked lack of sibling rivalry. Most of their works were written together, a practice begun in childhood when they shared a desk and sustained throughout their adult lives. Since their lives and work were so collaborative, it is difficult now to differentiate between them, but of course there were differences.- Jacob, who studied for a time in Paris, was fascinated with variant spellings of older words. He articulated "Grimm's Law," the rules of which are still used today to determine correspondences between the consonants of German and languages in the Indo-European family. Jacob was bolder and more experimental than Wilhelm, and was rumored to be a lively dancer. Throughout his life, Jacob kept rigidly to schedule and could be extremely focused on work that demanded close attention to detail. He never married, but was a loving uncle to Wilhelm's children. Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm are buried side by side in Berlin.

Bibliographic information