Tales from the German of Heinrich Zschokke, Volumes 1-2

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Parke Godwin
Wiley and Putnam, 1845 - German fiction
 

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Page 239 - Liberia, Madeira, Sierra Leone, and other places of interest on the West Coast of Africa. By an Officer of the US Navy. Edited by NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE.
Page 215 - Jones sent me his •bill for the year. Considering what we had had of him, it was larger than we had expected, although we had had nothing of which we did not ourselves keep an account. Only he had raised the price of all his articles. Otherwise, his account agreed honestly with ours. The worst is the arrears of my last year's bill.
Page 239 - OF AMERICAN BOOKS, a series intended to embrace original works of merit and interest from the pens of American authors. The design can scarcely fail to be successful. We have a firm faith that books well worth reading, — as well worth it as English books of the same class, — can be produced in this country ; and such books, and such only, we presume Messrs. Wiley & Putnam intend to publish in their series. This first number is well worthy its place.
Page 221 - Some hours after. — Already I feel more composed. I would have thrown myself into the arms of God and prayed. But I was not well. I lay down on my bed. I believe I have slept, perhaps also I fainted. Some three hours have passed. My daughters have covered my feet with pillows. I am weak in body, but my heart is again fresh.
Page 90 - ... trifling circumstances therewith connected, or frequently some particular scene in that life, has passed quite involuntarily, and as it were dream-like, yet perfectly distinct before me. During this time I usually feel so entirely absorbed in the contemplation of the...
Page 207 - We must deny ourselves some of our luxuries. Dec. 16. — I do believe Jenny's an angel. Her soul is even more beautiful than her body. I am almost ashamed of being her father. She is so much better and more pious than I. I had not the courage yesterday to tell my girls the bad news. When I mentioned it to-day Jenny at first looked very serious, but suddenly she brightened up and said, " Thou art disquieted, father !" " Should I not be so ?"
Page 244 - HATFIELD. THE AMERICAN HOUSE CARPENTER. A Treatise upon Architecture, Cornices, and Mouldings, Framing, Doors, Windows, and Stairs ; together with the most important principles of Practical Geometry.
Page 91 - A dead silence prevailed during the whole narration, which I alone occasionally interrupted by inquiring whether I spoke the truth. The startled young man confirmed every particular, and even, what I had scarcely expected, the last mentioned. Touched by his candor, I shook hands with him over the table, and said no more. He asked my name, which I gave him, and we remained together talking till past midnight. He is probably still living!
Page 100 - ... or fair of the city of Vence. It was truly a joyful time, and though they had but little gold to buy with, there were many goods to look at. Now Marietta and Mother Manon went to the fair with the rest, and Colin was also there. He bought a great many curiosities and trifles for his friends — but he would not spend a farthing for Marietta. And yet he was always at her elbow, though he did not speak to her, nor she to him. It was easy to see that he was brooding over some scheme of wickedness....
Page 226 - Thus the matter was soon settled. The child continued to sleep sweetly on. In the meanwhile, we exhausted ourselves in conjectures about its parents, who were undoubtedly known to us, as the box was directed to me. Polly, alas ! could tell us nothing more of the person who brought it than she had already told. Now, while the little thing sleeps, and I run over my New Year's sermon upon " the Power of the Eternal Providence," my daughters are holding a council about the nursing of the poor stranger.

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