Tales from the 'Phantasus,' etc

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James Burns, 1845 - 11 pages
 

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Page 29 - Emma sing the wellknown song to the lute. I did not even attempt to disguise my enmity, and when my parents reproached me for my conduct, I turned away from them with an obstinate and wilful air. I wandered for hours together in the woods and among the rocks, indulging evil thoughts, chiefly directed against myself. I had already determined upon my rival's death. "In the course of a few months the young knight declared his wishes to Emma's parents, and they were received with pleasure. All that was...
Page 25 - Many were the confused questions and answers which passed between them ; and Frederick often trembled at the strange wild glances of his friend : the fire seemed to sparkle in his eyes. He agreed, however, to sojourn with him ; but when he had remained a few days, he informed Frederick that he was about to go upon a pilgrimage to Borne.
Page 12 - Inquire nothing," said one of the pages, casting down his eyes: " it would only grieve you; — better turn back." "And Dietrich," added the old man, — "where is he?" " Mention his name no more," said an aged knight ; " the duke's rage was kindled, and he thought to punish you through him.
Page 31 - I embraced him with the most terrific, soul-cutting emotion. I clung to him for protection like a feeble child, — burning tears ran down my breast; but I uttered no sound. My father kissed me, and I shuddered as I felt his lips, for they were deadly cold — cold as if I had been kissed by the dead. ' How is it with you, dear father?
Page 34 - ... perfumes over my head ; and tones of music burst forth from nature's inmost heart, and with their undulating freshness restored the ardour of our desires, while soft mists and dews stole over flowery fields, giving new essence to their ravishing odours. " How many years thus passed, I am quite unable to state, for here was no time and no divisions; the luscious charm of virgin beauty burned in the flowers, and in the forms of girls bloomed the fragrant charm of the flowers; their colours seemed...
Page 31 - I felt at his heart, but it was quite still; yet, in the bitter agony of my woe, I held the body fast clasped in my embrace. " By a sudden glimmer, like the first break of morning, which shot through the gloomy chamber, I there saw my father's spirit close to that of my mother; and both gazed upon me with a compassionate expression, as I stood with the dear deceased in my arms. From that moment I saw and heard no more. I lay deprived of consciousness; and I was found by the servants delirious, and...
Page 29 - The nuptial-day of my rival was drawing nigh, and my agony proportionably increased : it hurried me through the woods and across the mountains, as if pursued by a grizzly phantom by day and by night. I called down the most frightful maledictions both upon Emma and myself. I had not a single friend to advise with — no one wished to receive me — for all seemed to have given me over for lost. Yes ! for the detested fearful eve of the bridal-day was at hand...
Page 33 - Eckart,' exclaimed the supernatural form ;—' and> praise to the goodness of the blessed God, I am permitted to hold watch here, to deter the unhappy from rushing into the base fiend's power.' I rushed on. On passing, I found my way led through subterraneous passages in the mountain. The path was so narrow, as to compel me to force my way : I heard the gushing of the hidden waters, and the noise of...
Page xix - WILIGHT was already gathering, when a young knight, mounted on his charger, trotted through a lonely vale : the clouds grew gradually darker, and the glow of evening paler: a little brook murmured softly along, concealed by the mountain bushes that overhung it. The knight sighed, and surrendered himself to thought ; the bridle hung loose on the horse's neck ; the steed itself no longer felt the rider's spur, and now paced slowly along the narrow path that wound round the precipitous rock.
Page 27 - One dream, in particular, made an indelible impression upon my mind, although 1 was unable to recall its individual features clearly to my memory. " I thought I could see an immense concourse of people in the streets, — I heard unintelligible words and languages, and I turned away, and went in the dark night to the house of my parents, where I found only my father, who was unwell. The next morning I threw my arms round both my parents' necks — embracing them tenderly, as if I felt that some evil...

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