Tales in Verse

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J. Munroe & Company, 1842 - 172 pages
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Page 42 - My mother lay upon her bed, Her spirit sorely tossed With dismal thoughts of storm and wreck Upon some savage coast ; But morn and eve we prayed to Heaven That he might not be lost. And when the pleasant spring came on, And fields again were green, He sent a letter full of news Of the wonders he had seen ; Praying us to think him dutiful, As he afore had been.
Page 111 - THE SNOW-DROP. THE snow-drop! 'Tis an English flower, And grows beneath our garden trees ; For every heart it has a dower, And old and dear remembrances! All look upon it, and straightway Recall their youth like yesterday, Their sunny years, when forth they went, Wandering in measureless content; Their little plot of garden-ground ; The mossy orchard's quiet bound ; Their father's house, so free from care, And the familiar faces there ! The household voices kind and sweet, That knew no feigning —...
Page 40 - come forth Beneath the sunny sky ; Why stand you musing all alone, With such an anxious eye ? What is it, child, that aileth you...
Page 41 - said I ; " what is there here Beside your cottage door, To make a merry girl like you Thus idly stand to pore? There is a mystery in this thing — Now tell me, Ellen More...
Page 38 - tis merrier far to swing, to swing. Merry it is on a winter's night To listen to tales of elf and sprite, Of caves and castles...
Page 85 - Tis as handsome a kitten as ever you saw, Equipped like a cat, with tail, whisker, and claw. See, here it is ready for pastime and freak, Though it looks at this moment so sober and meek : Yes, Harry, examine it over and over, 'Tis really the kitten no one could discover...
Page 85 - Tis really the kitten no one could discover ! 2. O Kit, we have sought you above and below ; We have gone where a mouser never could go ; We have hunted in garrets with diligent care, In chambers and closets — but you were not there...
Page 42 - Again he wrote a letter long, Without a word of gloom ; And soon, and very soon, he said, He should again come home : — I watched, as now, beside the door, And yet he did not come. " I watched and watched, but I knew not then It would be all in vain ; For very sick he lay the while, In a hospital in Spain. Ah, me ! I fear my brother dear Will ne'er come home again. " And now I watch — for we have heard That he is on his way, And the letter said, in very truth, He would be here to-day. Oh ! there...
Page 108 - And after months 01 weary woe, Sickness, and travel sore, He sent the blessed English ship That took us from that shore. And now, without a home or friend, I wander far and near, And tell my miserable tale To all who lend an ear. Thus sitting by your happy hearths, Beside your mother's knee, How should you know the...
Page 87 - The summer eve's breeze doth faintly blow; When the mighty sea shines clear, unstirred By the wavering tide or the dipping bird. They come in the rush of the surging storm...

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