Tales of a Pilgrim

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Hunter, 1827 - 394 pages
 

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Page 125 - Where shall the traitor rest, He, the deceiver, Who could win maiden's breast, Ruin, and leave her? In the lost battle, Borne down by the flying, Where mingles war's rattle With groans of the dying; Eleu loro There shall he be lying.
Page 109 - It haunts me still, though many a year has fled, Like some wild melody. Alone it hangs Over a mouldering heir-loom, its companion, An oaken chest, half eaten by the worm, But richly carved by Antony of Trent, With Scripture stories from the life of Christ. A chest that came from Venice and had held The ducal robes of some old ancestor...
Page 153 - Nor, cruel as it seemed, could he Their haste himself condemn, Aware that flight in such a sea Alone could rescue them ; Yet bitter felt it still to die Deserted and his friends so nigh. ' He long survives who lives an hour In ocean self-upheld : And so long he with unspent power His destiny repelled ; And ever as the minutes flew Entreated help, or cried Adieu...
Page 255 - THE winds are high on Helle's wave, As on that night of stormy water When Love, who sent, forgot to save The young, the beautiful, the brave, The lonely hope of Sestos
Page 386 - In these circumstances, it would only have been endangering my own liberty to have openly recognised him ; but I could not bring myself to leave Angers while his fate was undecided, and therefore resolved to remain there till after his arraignment. It was then the policy of the reigning family to expedite the progress of justice ; and, in the course of...
Page 396 - QUOTATIONS from the BRITISH POETS ; being a Pocket Dictionary of their most admired passages. The whole alphabetically arranged according to the subjects.
Page 388 - ... and the agony of her own mind without complaint. She was no longer the timid heart-stricken girl whom I had known under her father's roof, but the magnanimous wife, resolute even to death to succour her husband. As the vehicle in which we travelled emerged from the defile of Sevre, and the towers and palaces of Paris rose in splendour before us, I tried in vain to interest her by pointing out the more prominent features of the scene, and recapitulating the historical events with which they were...
Page 109 - Scripture stories from the life of Christ,— A chest that came from Venice, and had held The ducal robes of some old ancestor, That, by the way — it may be true or false — But don't forget the picture ; and you will not When you have heard the tale they told me there. She was an only child, — her name Ginevra, The joy, the pride, of an indulgent father ; And in her fifteenth year became a bride, Marrying an only son, Francesco Doria, Her playmate from her birth, and her first love. Just as...
Page 364 - Place," — a small square, ornamented by several rows of slim lime-trees, and a lofty cross, covered with a variety of offerings symbolical of the church of Rome. The hotel was a heavy grotesque pile, by far too large for the purpose to which it was at present devoted. It had been the chateau of the seigneur of the village under the old regime, and a prison during the horrid alternation of the revolution. Its hereditary possessor, as I afterwards learned, had, in common with many of his retainers,...
Page 384 - ... France. Jacqueline, when you hear from the south, or from the west, the proud war-cry of Napoleon, — the cry which your husband's •voice has assisted to swell on many a crimson field, — then remember Delagarde. When you are told that the once unconquered eagle has again appeared among the vallies of France, let your womanly heart exult ; for it guides 'me back to your arms. These will be prouder times for the beloved of Delagarde.

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