Tales of Humour, Gallantry, & Romance

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Charles Baldwyn, 1824 - Italian fiction - 253 pages
 

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An Awesome Book, I am so delighted to read this book and feeling lucky too, as one does not only reads the awesome stories, but also comes across the cultures, language, Mannerism used by Italy and neighbouring countires.
A Must Buy....

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Page 235 - Thus resolved, one day after dinner he went to her, and found a cousin of her's with her. Having given her to understand he had some private business with her, the cousin knowing how much she was indebted to him, and her expectations, left the room, and departed, saying, he begged she would be advised by her worthy neighbour. As soon as he was gone he shut the door, went into his room, and motioned her to follow ; she, struck with the singularity of the case, and fearing for her honour, did not know...
Page 238 - When will you give her the ring?" said the holy man. " This very day," he answered, " if she be inclined." " Well," said the friar, " go thy ways, and leave all to me; go home, and stir not from thence — these blessed nuptials shall take place.
Page 232 - ... above the surface. He was almost stifled with the water he had swallowed, and was carried away by the current, so that he very shortly lost his senses. Gabriel, who was very busy catching a great deal of fish in a very good place, did not care to leave it ; therefore poor Lazarus, after rising half dead two or three times, sunk at last never to rise again. Gabriel, after he had got as much fish as he thought would do for him, joyfully turned round to show Lazarus his sport ; he looked round and...
Page 232 - ... laid him on some grass, put his own breeches on the dead limbs, untied the nets from his own arms, and tied them tight to the arms of the corpse. This done, he took hold of him, dived into the water, and tied him fast with the nets to the stake under water. He then came on shore, slipped on Lazarus...
Page 231 - ... the other ; the wife herself would have been deceived but for the clothes, those of Lazarus being fine cloth, and her husband's of coarse wool of a different colour. Lazarus, observing this extraordinary resemblance, could not help fancying that there must be something in it, and began to familiarise himself with his society, sent his wife presents of eatables, wines, &c., and often invited Gabriel to dinner or supper with him, and conversed with him. Gabriel, though poor and untaught, was shrewd...
Page 233 - Thus he went on, weeping and sobbing, as if regretting the loss of Gabriel, and really agonized by the distress of his widow. He was inwardly praised by all present, who believed him to be Lazarus. The poor widow, after the funeral was performed, returned to Pisa, much comforted by the promises of him, whom she considered as her neighbour Lazarus. Gabriel, who had been long acquainted with the deceased's ways, manners, and mode of living, entered Lazarus's house, as if the master of it; without uttering...
Page 237 - When evening came on, observing the same uniform conduct of his predecessor, he went to bed, but could .not sleep for thinking. No sooner did the dawn appear than he rose and went to the church of St. Catherine, where a devout and worthy pastor dwelt, and who was considered by all the Pisanians as a little saint. Friar Angelico appearing, Gabriel told him he wanted to speak to him on particular business, and to have his advice upon a very important and singular case that had happened to him. The...
Page 231 - He said he was resolved to wait four years before he would marry ; so that his obstinate disposition being well known, they ceased their importunities. Lazarus, intent upon pleasing himself alone, would not associate with any living soul. There was, however, one poor man, named Gabriel, who lived in a small house opposite to him, with his wife Dame Santa. This poor fellow was an excellent fisherman and bird-catcher, made nets, &c., and what with that, and the assistance of his wife, who spun, he...
Page 229 - ... woman of Pisa, of very slender fortune, and fatherless and motherless ; by her he had three sons, and a daughter who in due time was married in Pisa; the eldest son was likewise married, the younger one was at school ; the middle one, whose name was Lazarus, although great sums had been spent upon his education, made nothing of it; he was naturally idle and stupid, of a sour and melancholy disposition ; a man of few words, and obstinate to such a degree, that if once he had said NO to any thing,...
Page 231 - Gabriel wae a perfect likeness of Lazarus; both were red-haired, had the same length of beard, every feature, size, gait, and voice so perfectly alike, that one would have sworn they were twins ; and had they both been dressed alike, certainly no one but would have mistaken the one for the other: the wife herself would have been deceived but for the clothes, those of Lazarus being fine cloth, and her husband's of coarse wool of a different colour. Lazarus, observing this extraordinary resemblance,...

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