Tales of the Drama: Founded on the Tragedies of Shakespeare, Massinger, Shirley, Rowe, Murphy, Lillo, and Moore, and on the Comedies of Steel, Farquhar, Cumbrland, Bickerstaff, Goldsmith, and Mrs. Cowley

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Page 157 - I'd have you buy and sell so ; so give alms ; Pray so ; and, for the ordering your affairs, To sing them too. When you do dance, I wish you A wave o' the sea, that you might ever do Nothing but that ; move still, still so, And own no other function : each your doing, So singular in each particular, Crowns what you are doing in the present deeds, That all your acts are queens.
Page 420 - This was the noblest Roman of them all; All the conspirators save only he Did that they did in envy of great Caesar; He only, in a general honest thought, And common good to all, made one of them. His life was gentle, and the elements So mix'd in him that Nature might stand up And say to all the world, 'This was a man!
Page 313 - Nay, take my life and all ; pardon not that : You take my house, when you do take the prop That doth sustain my house ; you take my life, When you do take the means whereby I live.
Page 274 - there is more joy in heaven over one sinner that repenteth, than over ninety and nine just persons that need no repentance.
Page 180 - ... arts you labour to destroy ; A thousand ways our ruin you pursue, Yet blame in us those arts first taught by you.
Page 404 - ... breed of noble bloods ! When went there by an age, since the great flood, But it was...
Page 369 - I'ma beggar. — Why, tell it now. I, that can bear the ruin of those dearer to me — the ruin of a sister and her infant, can bear that too. Bev. No more of this — you wring my heart. Char.
Page 161 - Perfume for a lady's chamber ; Golden quoifs and stomachers, For my lads to give their dears: Pins and poking-sticks of steel. What maids lack from head to heel: Come buy of me, come; come buy, come buy; Buy, lads, or else your lasses cry...
Page 356 - Not handled too roughly, nor play'd on too much ! The sparrow and linnet will feed from your hand, Grow tame by...
Page 378 - I'll bear them patiently, so he be happy! These hands shall toil for his support; these eyes be lifted up for hourly blessings on him; and every duty of a fond and faithful wife be doubly done to cheer and comfort him. So hear me ! so reward me ! [Rises.] Bev. I would kneel too, but that offended heaven would turn my prayers into curses; for I have done a deed to make life horrible to you.

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