Tales of woman's trials

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1847 - 80 pages
 

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Page 161 - The soote season, that bud and blome forth brings, With grene hath clad the hill, and eke the vale; The nightingale with feathers new she sings, The turtle to her mate hath told her tale." And, passing over the two first months of summer,
Page 275 - love her, comfort her, honour and keep her in sickness and in health; and, forsaking all others, keep him only unto her so long as they both should live.
Page 330 - He that loves a rosy cheek, Or a coral lip admires, Or from star-like eyes doth seek Fuel to maintain his fires— As old Time makes these decay So his flames must waste away." She paused, for a moment, at the conclusion of the first verse, and stole a quiet glance at her companion; but there was no expression that could induce her either to continue or forbear.
Page 330 - But a smooth and stedfast mind, Gentle thoughts and calm desires, Hearts with equal love combin'd, Kindle never-dying fires: Where these are not, I despise Lovely cheeks, or lips, or eyes." " You are fond of the lays of the olden time," said Lady Leslie, with a sigh; " but I care not for either the modern or the ancient rhymsters; why should I care for
Page 272 - The good things that belong to prosperity are to be wished, but the good things that belong to adversity are to be admired.
Page 20 - to do my duty in that state of life to which it has pleased God to call me, and
Page 447 - information as to the real state of Mansfield's affairs. He found they were by no means in so bad a state as he had heard at first; that if the heedless man had possessed the moral courage to investigate them steadily, some outlay at the present, and retrenchment for the future, would bring them round. But it was in vain
Page 75 - will be enough of them soon. Mr. Glasscott," she continued, closing the door, " hear me while I am able to bear testimony, lest weakness —woman's weakness—overcome me, and I falter in the truth. In the broom-sellers' cottage, across the common, on the left side of the chimney, concealed by a large flat stone, is a
Page 73 - Cautiously she crept down from her hiding-place ; and, crawling along the ground with stealth and silence, knelt before the little window, so as to observe, through the broken shutter the occupation of the inmates. The dog alone was conscious of her approach ; but the men were too seriously engaged to heed
Page 75 - weakness—overcome me, and I falter in the truth. In the broom-sellers' cottage, across the common, on the left side of the chimney, concealed by a large flat stone, is a hole—there much of the property taken from Sir Thomas Purcel's last night is concealed." " I have long suspected these men—Smith,

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