Talk of Darkness

Front Cover
University of Texas Press, Dec 1, 2008 - Biography & Autobiography - 100 pages

Fatna El Bouih was first arrested in Casablanca as an 18-year-old student leader with connections to the Marxist movement. Over the next decade she was rearrested, forcibly disappeared, tortured, and transferred between multiple prisons. While imprisoned, she helped organize a hunger strike, completed her undergraduate degree in sociology, and began work on a Master's degree.

Beginning with the harrowing account of her kidnapping during the heightened political tension of the 1970s, Talk of Darkness tells the true story of one woman's struggle to secure political prisoners' rights and defend herself against an unjust imprisonment.

Poetically rendered from Arabic into English by Mustapha Kamal and Susan Slyomovics, Fatna El Bouih's memoir exposes the techniques of state-instigated "disappearance" in Morocco and condemns the lack of laws to protect prisoners' basic human rights.

 

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Contents

Or the Narrative of Suffering
1
Chapter 2
2
Chapter 3
3
Chapter 4
4
Chapter 5
5
The Trip to Meknes Prison
7
Chapter 8
8
Imposed Violence
23
An Incredible Visit
41
The Minaret Collapsed and They Hanged the Barber
43
Season of Spring Life and Happiness
55
A Prisoner Gives Birth to a Free Person
57
Despairing Screams Suppressed Grief
60
Shards of Time in the Life of a Woman Prisoner
71
The Autumn of a Life without Spring
73
The Prison House of the Woman Jailer in Sidi Kacem
76

A Nights Sojourn in Laalou Prison
29
Trial Day
34
The Inseparable Twosome
39
The Prison that Was a Refuge after the Isolation in
79
Notes
97
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Fatna El Bouih went on to become a high school teacher after her release from prison and continues to devote herself to human rights. She is one of the founders of the first shelter for battered women in Casablanca and works for released prisoners’ reintegration into society and the abolition of the death penalty in Morocco.

Mustapha Kamal is Assistant Professor of Arabic Language and Literature at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He himself was a political prisoner in Morocco.

Susan Slyomovics is Professor of Anthropology and Near Eastern Languages and Cultures at UCLA. She has written extensively on the Middle East and North Africa.

Bibliographic information