Talking God

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Harper Collins, Oct 13, 2009 - Fiction - 368 pages
9 Reviews

A grave robber and a corpse reunite Navajo Tribal Police Lt. Joe Leaphorn and Officer Jim Chee. As Leaphorn seeks the identity of a murder victim, Chee is arresting Smithsonian conservator Henry Highhawk for ransacking the sacred bones of his ancestors. As the layers of each case are peeled away, it becomes shockingly clear that they are connected, that there are mysterious others pursuing Highhawk, and that Leaphorn and Chee have entered into the dangerous arena of superstition, ancient ceremony, and living gods.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - rosalita - LibraryThing

Joe Leaphorn and Jim Chee of the Navajo Tribal Police find themselves far from the reservation, in Washington, D.C., following separate leads that converge into one murder case. One of the key plot ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - buffalogr - LibraryThing

Fast-paced fun. Leaphorn and Chee go to DC, a departure from the Navajo Reservation mysteries we're accustomed to reading form Tony Hillerman. The mystery still exists, but the cache and the genre are ... Read full review

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About the author (2009)

Tony Hillerman (1925–2008), an Albuquerque, New Mexico, resident since 1963, was the author of 29 books, including the popular 18-book mystery series featuring Navajo police officers Jim Chee and Joe Leaphorn, two non-series novels, two children’s books, and nonfiction works. He had received every major honor for mystery fiction; awards ranging from the Navajo Tribal Council's commendation to France 's esteemed Grand prix de litterature policiere. Western Writers of America honored him with the Wister Award for Lifetime achievement in 2008. He served as president of the prestigious Mystery Writers of America, and was honored with that group’s Edgar Award and as one of mystery fiction’s Grand Masters. In 2001, his memoir, Seldom Disappointed, won both the Anthony and Agatha Awards for best nonfiction.

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