Tao Te Ching

Front Cover
Wordsworth Editions, May 7, 1996 - Fiction - 89 pages
4 Reviews

Translated with Notes by Arthur Waley. With an Introduction by Robert Wilkinson.

Dating from around 300BC, Tao Te Ching is the first great classic of the Chinese school of philosophy called Taoism. Within its pages is summed up a complete view of the cosmos and how human beings should respond to it. A profound mystical insight into the nature of things forms the basis for a humane morality and vision of political utopia.

The ideas in this work constitute one of the main shaping forces behind Chinese spirituality, art and science, so much so that no understanding of Chinese civilisation is possible without a grasp of Taoism. This edition presents the authoritative translation by Arthur Waley, with a new Introduction reflecting recent developments in the interpretation of the work.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I'd say giving anything 5 stars is like saying "sure", and so forth, every ass I don't feel like kissing among the living, reminds me not often of Laotzu, he was probably like one of the three stooges, probably the mean one, but , he is surely another person some people would overlook, and I'm sure he doesn't mind that but he is worth listening to, and can and has helped me get my ind on things other than what is available to see.  

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

test

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
3
Section 3
7
Section 4
9
Section 5
11
Section 6
12
Section 7
13
Section 8
14
Section 18
40
Section 19
42
Section 20
43
Section 21
45
Section 22
47
Section 23
49
Section 24
51
Section 25
52

Section 9
17
Section 10
19
Section 11
20
Section 12
23
Section 13
27
Section 14
29
Section 15
31
Section 16
37
Section 17
39
Section 26
53
Section 27
55
Section 28
59
Section 29
61
Section 30
63
Section 31
65
Section 32
68
Section 33
83
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1996)

Lao Tzu, a Chinese philosopher, is considered to be the founder of Taoism. His birth and death dates are uncertain. According to legend, Lao Tzu was keeper of the archives at the imperial court. When he was eighty years old he set out for the western border of China, saddened and disillusioned that men were unwilling to follow the path to natural goodness. At the border, he was asked by a border guard to record his teachings before he left. These teachings were compiled into the Tao Te Ching (The Way and Its Power).

Arthur Waley (1889-1966) is highly regarded for his many translations of Chinese & Japanese literature.

Bibliographic information