Tao Te Ching

Front Cover
Counterpoint Press, 2001 - Philosophy - 97 pages
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Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching is not only the single most important text in Chinese spirituality, it is probably the most influential spiritual text in human history. Like all of his translations, Hinton's translation of the Tao Te Ching is mind-opening. It adds startling new dimensions to this text, revealing it as the originary text of deep environmental and feminist thought. In the past, virtually all translations of this text have been produced either by sinologists having little poetic facility in English, or writers having no ability to read the original Chinese. Hinton's fluency in ancient Chinese and his acclaimed poetic ability combine both of these essential qualifications. Together, they allow a breathtaking new translation that reveals how remarkably current and even innovative this text is after 2500 years.

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Tao te ching: a new translation

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Lao Tzu's classic Chinese text from the sixth century BCE has much to teach us today. Lao Tzu meditates on breath, enjoining the reader to practice breathing like a baby; reflects on hsu, or emptiness ... Read full review

The Tao Te Ching: A New Translation With Commentary

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Yet another translation of the Tao Te Ching would seem unnecessary, but this new one has considerably more depth than other recent efforts. It incorporates material from newly discovered texts and ... Read full review

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About the author (2001)

Laozi was a philosopher and poet of ancient China. He is best known as the reputed author of the Tao Te Ching and the founder of philosophical Taoism, but he is also revered as a deity in religious Taoism and traditional Chinese religions. Although a legendary figure, he is usually dated to around the 6th century BC and seen as a contemporary of Confucius, but some historians contend that he actually lived during the Warring States period of the 5th or 4th century BC. Laozi is traditionally regarded as the author of the Daodejing (Tao Te Ching). It is one of the most significant treatises in Chinese cosmogony. As with most other ancient Chinese philosophers, Laozi often explains his ideas by way of paradox, analogy, appropriation of ancient sayings, repetition, symmetry, and rhyme. In fact, the whole book can be read as an analogy the ruler is the awareness, or self, in meditation and the myriad creatures or empire is the experience of the body, senses and desires.

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