Taps for a Jim Crow Army: Letters from Black Soldiers in World War II

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University Press of Kentucky, 1983 - History - 278 pages
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Contents

Uncle Sams Boys
xliii
The Dilemma of the Black Officer
29
Laborers in Uniform
57
Illusions of Democracy
77
Biased White Officers
97
Appeals to the White House
123
Cruel and Usual Punishment
141
Northern Racism
163
The Dreaded South
181
Working with Pain
203
Jim Crow Goes Abroad
225
Conclusion
241
Recommended Books
261
Index
262
Copyright

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Page xxviii - The policy of the War Department is not to intermingle colored and white enlisted personnel in the same regimental organizations. This policy has been proven satisfactory over a long period of years, and to make changes would produce situations destructive to morale and detrimental to the preparation for national defense.
Page xlii - Henry L. Stimson and McGeorge Bundy, On Active Service in Peace and War (New York: Harper and Brothers, 1948); while the strongly anti-Stimson view taken by Richard N.
Page xxxvi - Provided, That In the selection and training of men under this Act, and in the interpretation and execution of the provisions of this Act, there shall be no discrimination against any person on account of race or color...
Page xxviii - ... for national defense. For similar reasons the Department does not contemplate assigning colored Reserve officers other than those of the Medical Corps and chaplains to existing Negro combat units of the Regular Army. These regular units are going concerns, accustomed through many years to the present system. Their morale is splendid, their rate of re-enlistment is exceptionally high, and their field training is well advanced.

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