Taras Bulba: And Other Tales

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The Floating Press, Oct 1, 2011 - Fiction - 361 pages
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Explore a fascinating period in history through the eyes of renowned Russian literary realist Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol. This historian-turned-fiction-writer had a lifelong interest in the culture of the Ukranian Cossacks, the community at the center of the tale "Taras Bulba" and several of the other stories brought together in this engrossing and meticulously researched collection.
 

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Contents

Introduction
4
TARAS BULBA
15
Chapter I
16
Chapter II
30
Chapter III
42
Chapter IV
53
Chapter V
65
Chapter VI
78
ST JOHNS EVE
165
THE CLOAK
184
HOW THE TWO IVANS QUARRELLED
219
Chapter I
220
Chapter II
226
Chapter III
240
Chapter IV
246
Chapter V
260

Chapter VII
91
Chapter VIII
108
Chapter IX
119
Chapter X
135
Chapter XI
143
Chapter XII
157
Chapter VI
267
Chapter VII
275
THE MYSTERIOUS PORTRAIT
286
THE CALASH
343
Endnotes
359
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Nikolai Vasilevich Gogol was born in 1809 in the Ukraine. His father was an amateur playwright who had a small estate with a number of serfs. From the ages of 12 to 19, young Gogol attended a boarding school where he became known for his sharp wit and ability to amuse his classmates. After school he worked as a government clerk. He soon began writing memories of his childhood. His quaint depictions of the Ukrainian countryside marked his style and helped to make him famous. Gogol quickly gained fame and formed a friendship with the influential poet, Aleksandr Pushkin. Gogol is largely remembered for his realistic characterizations, his rich imagination, and his humorous style. His works include Mirgorod, a collection of short stories including Taras Bulba. Gogol's wit is evident in his short story, The Nose, where a man's nose wanders off around town in a carriage. Gogol's masterpiece is the novel Dead Souls. In this work, a swindler plots to buy from landowners their dead serfs. Towards the end of Gogol's life, his creative powers faded and he fled to Moscow. Here, he came under the power of a fanatical priest. Ten days before his death he burned some manuscripts of the second part of Dead Souls. He died of starvation in 1852, on the cusp of madness.

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