Tartuffe: a comedy in five acts

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Harcourt Brace, Feb 1, 1997 - Drama - 223 pages
9 Reviews
The translation into English verse of one of Molire’s most masterful and most popular plays. “A continuous delight from beginning to end” (Richard Eberhart). Introduction by Richard Wilbur.

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User Review  - trilliams - LibraryThing

The humor's a bit outdated, and it's rather short, but if you know anything about how strong the church was in the 1600s then this is the boldest play you will ever read. The balls, Moliere, the balls. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AliceAnna - LibraryThing

I prefer the version in verse, but in any event, the story is wonderful. The language of Moliere (even if translated) is what makes it all really work. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
32
Section 2
33
Section 3
200
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

MoliA]re is one of the greatest writers of comedy of all time. Works include Les Fourberies de Scapin, Tartuffe, The Misanthrope, The Miser, and The Hypochondriac.

When Richard Wilbur's Things of This World (1956) won the 1957 Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award the same year, the N.Y. Times commented editorially: "A seemingly effortless craftsman, Mr. Wilbur reveals a fine lyrical gift, a searching wit and, in his translations, a sympathetic kinship to the works of others." Wilbur was born in New York City and educated at Amherst College and Harvard University. During the late 1950s he taught at Wesleyan University. He has also been on the English faculty at Harvard and Wellesley College, and he is a member of both the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Institute of Arts and Letters. With Lillian Hellman he wrote the libretto for the opera Candide. He also is one of the premier translators of his generation. He has translated Moliere's Tartuffe and Misanthrope and many poems of Andrei Voznesensky and others. Co-recipient of the Bollingen Translation Prize in 1963, he was made the second Poet Laureate of the United States in 1987.

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