Tastes of Paradise: A Social History of Spices, Stimulants, and Intoxicants

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Jun 29, 1993 - Social Science - 256 pages
6 Reviews
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From the extravagant use of pepper in the Middle Ages to the Protestant bourgeoisie's love of coffee to the reason why fashionable Europeans stopped sniffing tobacco and starting smoking it, Schivelbusch looks at how the appetite for pleasure transformed the social structure of the Old World. Illustrations.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - wealhtheowwylfing - LibraryThing

A history of stimulants and intoxicants in Europe and America over the last two thousand years, with especial focus to the impacts of colonialism and the industrial revolution. Full of fascinating ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Kellswitch - LibraryThing

"A well written and informative book without being overwhelming. This isn't the most in depth book or look at these topics but it did give me some new perspectives on trade and goods, especially "addictive" goods than I had before." Read full review

Contents

Spices or the Dawn of the Modern Age
3
Coffee and the Protestant Ethic
15
The Significance or Alcohol before the Seventeenth Century
22
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Wolfgang Schivelbusch was born in Berlin in 1941 and is a German scholar, historian, and author. In 2003 he was awarded the Heinrich Mann Prize of the Academy of Arts in Berlin. He currently lives in New York.

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