Tatian's Diatessaron: Its Creation, Dissemination, Significance, and History in Scholarship

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BRILL, 1994 - Religion - 555 pages
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A gospel harmony composed "c." 172 C.E., the "Diatessaron" is one of the earliest witnesses to the gospels. Regarded as the first version of the gospels in Latin, Syriac, and Armenian, the "Diatessaron" was used by Encratites, Judaic-Christians, and "Great Church" Christians alike. This study is the first comprehensive treatment of the "Diatessaron" in more than a century. After sketching the second-century setting and Tatian's biography, it describes virtually every Diatessaronic witness and provides a scholar-by-scholar summary of research from 546 to the present. Criteria for reconstructing Diatessaronic readings are developed, and numerous examples offer the reader first-hand experience with the witnesses. It contains the first Bibliography of research on the "Diatessaron" (600+ titles) and the first "Catalogue of Manuscripts of Diatessaronic Witnesses and Related Works" ever published.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The SecondCentury Background
9
Tatian
35
A History of Diatessaronic Studies and
84
Using the Diatessaron
357
The Present and the Future
426
A Catalogue of Manuscripts of Diatessaronic
445
A Stemma of the Diatessaronic Tradition
490
Index Locorum
523
Index Codicum
532
Index Auctorum
540
Index Rerum
547
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Page 510 - MOSHEH BEN SHESHETH'S COMMENTARY ON JEREMIAH AND EZEKIEL. Edited from a Bodleian MS., with a Translation and Notes, by SR Driver. 8vo, sewed.

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About the author (1994)

William L. Petersen, Dr.Theol. (1984), University of Utrecht, is Associate Professor of New Testament and Christian Origins at the Pennsylvania State University. Publications include "The Diatessaron and Ephrem Syrus as Sources of Romanos the Melodist; Gospel Traditions in the Second Century."