Taxidancing

Front Cover
Ikon, Jan 1, 2007 - Poetry - 59 pages
1 Review
Poetry. The movement of TAXIDANCING by Paul Pines from the jazz poems of his Tin Palace days in the first section "After Hours," to the ruminative "Bits and Pieces," is what Laurel Blossom has called " a taki ride from the madness of existential struggle to the 'darkness of a dream' in which 'each of us (is) a center.'"

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

After Hours
7
The Devils Music
10
Taxidancing
12
The Tin Palace Troll
14
Hitlers Favorite Trumpet Player
15
Jazzmobile
16
Cocaine Cadenza
17
Museum High Jinks
18
Bebop Head for Richie Cole
24
A Eulogy Delivered by Mickey Tucker
25
Adios Pablo
26
Blues for Dick Jane
27
Justaposition
28
Malcolms Blues
29
Monks Dream
30
Largo
31

After Hours
19
Tompkins Square Meditation
20
After Sonny Rollins
21
Meteorology
22
The Death of Ted Berrigan
23
The Way It Happened
32
The Radix
35
Artifacts
36
So Long
38
Copyright

About the author (2007)

Paul Pines grew up in Brooklyn around the corner from Ebbet's Field and passed the early sixties on the Lower East Side of New York. He shipped out as a merchant seaman, spending 1965-66 in Vietnam, after which he drove a taxi and tended bar until he opened The Tin Palace in 1970, on the corner of 2nd Street & Bowery, the setting for his novel, The Tin Angel (Wm Morrow, 1983/ Author's Guild, 2008). Redemption (Editions du Rocher, 1997), a second novel, is set against the genocide of Guatemalan Mayans. My Brother's Madness (Curbstone, 2007) a memoir that explores the unfolding of two intertwined lives and the nature of delusion has recently enjoyed wide critical acclaim. Pines has also published seven volumes of poetry: Onion (Mulch, 1971), Hotel Madden Poems (Contact II, 1991, Pushcart nominee), Pines Songs (Ikon, 1993, Pushcart nominee), Breath (Ikon, 1996), ADRIFT ON BLINDING LIGHT (IKON 2003), TAXIDANCING (Ikon, 2007) and LAST CALL AT THE TIN PALACE (Marsh Hawk, 2009). Selections of his poetry have been set by composer Daniel Asia on his two CDs, Songs from the Page of Swords and Breath in a Ram's Horn, appear on the Summit label. Asia is currently composing music for a libretto by Pines based on The Tin Angel. Among his work as a translator he has contributed to Small Hours of the Night, Selected Poems of Roque Dalton, (Curbstone, 1996); Pyramids of Glass, (Corona 95); Nicanor Parra, Antipoems: New and Selected, (New Directions,1986). He is the editor of Dark Times Full of Light, the Juan Gelman tribute issue of The Cafe Riview (Summer, 2009). High praise for his work includes: The Tin Angel, "Superb" (The Washington Post), "This swift tale of murder and revenge rattled along stylishly and fulfills all our expectations for high-grade suspense" (The New York Times Book Review); My Brother's Madness, "great writing, no doubt about it" (NPR commentator Andre Codrescu), "It is ultimately a story of our own humanity" (Kirkus Review); Hotel Madden Poems, "brilliant and compelling" (American Book Review); Breath, "instantaneous travel along our internal galaxies" (American Book Review); and, Adrift on Blinding Light "[that] navigates the conscious and subconscious worlds with fluid, imaginative, and fascinating energy" (Multicultural Review). Pines has conducted workshops for the National Writers Voice program and lectured for the National Endowment for the Humanities. He has been a fellow at the MacDowell Colony, Ossabaw Foundation, and Virginia Center, as well as a recipient of an Artists' Fellowship, N.Y.S. Foundation for the Arts, 1984 and a CAPS Fellow, Poetry, 1976. He is a member of PEN, BMI, C.G. Jung Foundation, and The Author's Guild. Paul Pines lives in Glens Falls, New York, where he practices as a psychotherapist and hosts the Lake George Jazz Weekend.

Bibliographic information