Sams Teach Yourself Extreme Programming in 24 Hours

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Sams Publishing, 2002 - Computers - 454 pages

Extreme Programming (XP) is a new lightweight software developing methodology. XP is the most popular of the "agile" development methodologies. Agile development is an integral part of technology movements in the software development world. XP has quickly gained in popularity over the last few years and is now becoming recognized by development shops from large consulting firms through small software houses. Some of the companies that are using XP include DaimlerChrysler, First Union National Bank, and Ford Motor Company.

Sams Teach Yourself Extreme Programming in 24 Hours includes coverage on Extreme Programming, agile development, automated test frameworks (Junit, etc.), Automated Build (Ant), and Refactoring in a step-by-step approach.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
HOUR
5
Setting the XP Landscape
7
Hour
10
Hour
16
Hour
22
Workshop
23
Discovering What XP Is All About
25
Developing Software in Iterations
129
Using the XP Tools
173
Making the Most of Ant to Automate Your XP Project
269
Hour 23
290
Rolling Out XP in Your Organization
295
Hour 24
297
Selling and Getting Buyin to XP
313
Learning from XP Case Studies
327

Quiz
38
Quiz
52
Running Your XP Project
101
Planning Your Software Release with XP
115
Quiz
335
Appendixes
403
APPENDIx B Online Resources
411
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Stewart Baird is an independent consultant who splits his time between software development, leading, and writing. Prior to starting his own company, he worked for KPMG Consulting, New Zealand, where he was a leading evangelist in their Extreme Programming (XP) implementation. He's presented and taught on XP in both the United States and New Zealand. Nowadays he's kept busy by helping clients develop their solutions using XP and other Agile techniques.

Though spending most of his recent career working with Microsoft tools, he's a strong advocate of open source development. Initially, he started his working life in the avionics and embedded systems fields. Sometime in the late 80s he met and fell in love with the C programming language. Before long he was writing applications in IBM's OS/2 operating system; he never looked back and has been "doing software" ever since. That fact that he's lived and worked in the United States, England, New Zealand, Australia, and Germany might help to explain his outrageous accent. Currently, he and his family make their home just outside Wellington, New Zealand. He can be contacted through his company GDS at http: //www.greendoorservices.com.

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