Teachers' monographs: Plans and details of grade work. ...

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Page 21 - And he said, If the Syrians be too strong for me, then thou shalt help me: but if the children of Ammon be too strong for thee, then I will come and help thee. Be of good courage, and let us play the men for our people, and for the cities of our God: and the Lord do that which seemeth him good.
Page 123 - On the contrary, one who is educated is able practically to extricate himself, by means of the examples with which his memory is stored and of the abstract conceptions which he has acquired, from circumstances in which he never was placed before.
Page 122 - ... non-residents. The general policy of the city in regard to destitute, neglected, and wayward children is to send them to institutions under private control, paying a per capita allowance, usually $2 per week, for their support. There are twenty-five such institutions located in, or receiving children from, the former city of New York, now the boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx. In these institutions the city supports an average number of about 15,000 children, paying for their support a total...
Page 7 - ... man. This duty corresponds nearly to the one named Prudence in ancient ethical systems. The Christian Fathers discuss four cardinal virtues — Temperance, Prudence, Fortitude, and Justice. Prudence places the individual above and beyond his present moment, as it were, letting him stand over himself, watching and directing himself. Man is a two-fold being, having a particular, special self, and a general nature, his ideal self, the possibility of perfection. Self-culture stands for the theoretical...
Page 1 - America, he comes upon the fact that the matter of moral instruction in the schools belongs to the side known as discipline and not to the side known as instruction in books and theories. The first thing the child learns when he comes to school is to act according to certain forms — certain forms that are necessary in order to make possible the instruction of the school in classes or groups. The school is a social whole. The pupil must learn to act in such a way as not to interfere with the studies...
Page 8 - ... to secure its presence in the schoolroom. (2) Justice. — This is recognized as the chief in the family of secular virtues. It has several forms or species, as, for example, (a) honesty, the fair dealing with others, respect for their rights of person and property and reputation ; (b) truth-telling or honesty in speech — honesty itself being truth-acting. Such names as integrity, uprightness, righteousness, express further distinctions that belong to this stanch virtue.
Page vii - THOMAS AND MATTHEW ARNOLD, and their Influence on English Education.
Page 4 - In the recitation, as it is called by us in America (or in the lesson, as it is called by English educators), the teacher examines the work of his pupils, criticises it, and discusses its methods and results. The pupils in the class all give attention to the questions of the teacher and to the answers of their fellow pupils. Each one, as I have already described, learns both positive and negative things regarding the results of his own studies of the lesson. He finds some of his fellow pupils less...
Page 8 - ... in discovering the exact performance of each pupil and giving him recognition for it. may give place to injustice in case of carelessness on the part of the teacher. Such carelessness may suffer the weeds of lying and deceit to grow up, and it may allow the dishonest pupil to gather the fruits of honesty and truth, and thus it may offer a premium for fraud.
Page 118 - He should inspect by listening to recitations and by examination of the pupils' written work in language and other subjects. I have known the language work of a large school to be revolutionized in a few weeks by the principal's requiring his teachers to send to his office the children's written exercises, after they had been corrected but before they were returned to the writers. The principal's inspection should be hourly — daily. In it, or in allied work, he should spend his entire time during...

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