Teaching about Scientific Origins: Taking Account of Creationism

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Peter Lang, 2007 - Religion - 217 pages
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Persistent resistance to the teaching of evolution has so drastically impacted science curricula that many students finish school without a basic understanding of a theory that is a fundamental component of scientific literacy. This «evolution/creationism controversy» has crippled biological education in the United States and has begun to spread to other parts of the world. This book takes an educational point of view that respects both the teaching of evolution and religious beliefs. Authors from different academic traditions contribute to a collection of perspectives that begin to dismantle the notion that religion and science are necessarily incompatible.
 

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Contents

The History of the EvolutionCreationism Controversy
11
The Warfare between Darwinism and Christianity Who Is
31
Capturing the Educational Potential of Creation Science Debates
43
How Not to Teach the Controversy about Creationism
59
The Scientific Enterprise and Teaching about Creation
75
The Theory of Evolution Teaching the Whole Truth
89
Fundamentalist and Scientific Discourse Beyond
105
Examining the Evolutionary Heritage of Humans
125
Approaching the Conflict between Religion and Evolution
145
The Personal and the Professional in the Teaching of Evolution
159
Teaching for Understanding Rather than Expectation of Belief
179
Teaching about Origins in Science Where Now?
197
Notes on Contributors
209
Index
215
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About the author (2007)

The Editors: Leslie S. Jones is a science educator in the biology department at Valdosta State University in Georgia. She received her Ph.D. in mathematics, science, and technology education at The Ohio State University in Columbus. She published scientific articles in professional journals in the area of reproductive physiology before becoming involved in science education, where her current research focuses on postsecondary science education, educational equity, and the evolution/creationism controversy.
Michael J. Reiss is Professor of Science Education at the Institute of Education, University of London. He received his Ph.D. in evolutionary biology and population genetics from Cambridge University, and he is a priest in the Church of England. He has published numerous academic articles and is the author of a number of books including Science Education for a Pluralist Society, Ecology: Principles and Applications, and Understanding Science Lessons: Five Years of Science Teaching.

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