Teaching Social Communication to Children with Autism: A Manual for Parents

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Guilford Press, Jan 4, 2010 - Psychology - 131 pages
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This manual helps parents master proven techniques for teaching social-communication skills to young children with autism. The authors clearly describe the skills-building techniques and show how to integrate them into everyday family routines and activities. Designed for use as part of a therapist-guided program, the manual includes reproducible forms. Professionals who want to implement this approach should purchase Teaching Social Communication to Children with Autism: A Practitionera (TM)s Guide to Parent Training and A Manual for Parents.

 

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Contents

About This Manual
1
PartI Introduction
3
Overview of the Program
5
Set Up Your Home for Success
17
Part II
21
Follow Your Childs Lead
23
Imitate Your Child
29
Animation
33
Part III
71
Overview of the Direct Teaching Techniques
73
Teaching Your Child Expressive Language
80
Teaching Your Child Receptive Language
88
Teaching Your Child Social Imitation
94
Teaching Your Child Play
100
Review of the Direct Teaching Techniques
108
Part IV
113

Modeling and Expanding Language
39
Playful Obstruction
47
Balanced Turns
51
Communicative Temptations
59
Review of the Interactive Teaching Techniques
66
Putting It All Together
115
Moving Forward Final Session
121
Further Reading
125
Index
127
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About the author (2010)

Brooke Ingersoll, PhD, is a psychologist and board-certified behavior analyst with a doctoral degree in experimental psychology from the University of California, San Diego. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship in clinical child psychology at the Child Development and Rehabilitation Center at Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, during which time she served as codirector of the Autism Treatment and Research Program at the Hearing and Speech Institute (now known as the Artz Center) in Portland, Oregon. Dr. Ingersoll is currently Assistant Professor of Psychology at Michigan State University, East Lansing. She has conducted training for practitioners on early intervention strategies for children with autism spectrum disorders both nationally and internationally. Dr. Ingersoll has published extensively on early intervention for children with autism spectrum disorders and presented her work at professional conferences.

Anna Dvortcsak, MS, CCC-SLP, is a speech-language pathologist in private practice in Portland, Oregon. She received her master's degree from the University of Redlands, California. Mrs. Dvortcsak provides training to families with children with autism and individualized speech and language services. She specializes in training professionals in conducting parent training for young children with autism spectrum disorders. Prior to starting her own practice, Mrs. Dvortcsak was codirector of the Autism Treatment and Research Program at the Hearing and Speech Institute (now known as the Artz Center) in Portland. She has experience conducting research on the efficacy of interventions for children with autism and has presented her findings at the annual conventions of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the Oregon Speech and Hearing Association, as well as in peer-reviewed articles and chapters.

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