Teaching as Believing: Faith in the University

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Baylor University Press, 2004 - Education - 234 pages
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The public university classroom is a place where socialization still occurs: it's where students learn to be citizens of the world. Having attended to political correctness and multi-culturalism, universities are now facing the issue of spirituality in their quest to educate the whole person. In this book, Chris Anderson takes up this task by carefully exploring how a professor of faith can help a public university accomplish its pluralistic mission. Anderson illustrates how the study of secular literature throws fresh light on the ways in which the Bible can be read. He also deftly shows how a sympathetic study of the Bible trains secular readers for understanding the abiding significance of the Western literary canon as a kind of scripture. Anderson thus gives readers a book that is as much about the experience of a faithful teacher and the proper ends of education as it is about discovering the right ways to read texts--be they sacred or secular.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Way of the University
19
Teaching Genesis as Story
21
Teaching the Ecology of Mark
47
Intersections
78
The Odyssey as Eucharist
79
The Confessions as a Model for the Academic Life
105
The Way of Faith
137
Moving Beyond the University
139
Living the Difference
173
Conclusion
195
Notes
205
Works Cited
225
Index
231
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Chris Anderson (Ph.D. University of Washington) is Professor of English at Oregon State University, where he has taught since 1986. He is the author or co-author of ten books, including My Problem with Truth (2003), Asking Questions (2000), and Edge Effects (1993)--a finalist for the Oregon Book Award in creative nonfiction. Anderson is also a Catholic deacon and is active in parish and campus ministry.

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